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Light therapy and visual culture in Britain, c. 1890–1940

Soaking up the rays forges a new path for exploring Britain’s fickle love of the light by investigating the beginnings of light therapy in the country from c.1890-1940. Despite rapidly becoming a leading treatment for tuberculosis, rickets and other infections and skin diseases, light therapy was a contentious medical practice. Bodily exposure to light, whether for therapeutic or aesthetic ends, persists as a contested subject to this day: recommended to counter psoriasis and other skin conditions as well as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and depression; closely linked to notions of beauty, happiness and well-being, fuelling tourism to sunny locales abroad and the tanning industry at home; and yet with repeated health warnings that it is a dangerous carcinogen. By analysing archival photographs, illustrated medical texts, advertisements, lamps, and goggles and their visual representation of how light acted upon the body, Woloshyn assesses their complicated contribution to the founding of light therapy. Soaking up the rays will appeal to those intrigued by medicine’s visual culture, especially academics and students of the histories of art and visual culture, material cultures, medicine, science and technology, and popular culture.

The emergence of bioethics in British universities

academics in the humanities and social sciences to work on more ‘applied’ subjects such as bioethics. This combination of factors shaped the Centre for Social Ethics and Policy (CSEP) at the University of Manchester, which was established in 1986 by the philosopher John Harris, the lawyer Margaret Brazier, the theologian Anthony Dyson and the student health physician Mary Lobjoit. CSEP’s establishment reflected Harris’s interest in bioethics, Brazier’s work on tort law and medical negligence, Dyson’s belief that theology should engage with practical issues, and Lobjoit

in The making of British bioethics
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Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940

1 This point has also been made in Jan Kuhanen, Poverty, Health and Reproduction in Early Colonial Uganda , Joensuu, Finland, University of Joensuu Publications in the Humanities 37, 2005 , p. 247 2 This literature includes: Ann Beck, A History of the British Medical Administration of

in Beyond the state
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nature. According to Foucault’s famous dictum, notions of sexuality ‘­organized sex as a “fictitious unity”’ of distinct parts and functions, feelings and behaviours; new categories for describing and policing sex produced a new object of enquiry.1 The case study became the genre par excellence for discussing human sexuality across the humanities and the life sciences. Through the first sixty years of the twentieth century, sexologists, psychoanalysts, lawyers, medical practitioners and literary writers continued to avail themselves of the highly malleable and flexible

in A history of the case study
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have looked to influential scholars of art history and visual culture, especially those with interests in the history of medicine and the medical humanities. 57 Championing visual approaches to enrich our understanding of medicine, as Jordanova has called for, Soaking Up the Rays urges scholars with an interest in medical history to pay closer attention to its visual culture. This book

in Soaking up the rays
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Introduction Birgit Lang, Joy Damousi and Alison Lewis A History of the Case Study represents a critical intervention into contem­ porary debate concerning the construction of knowledge which – after Michel Foucault’s elaborations on modern discourses of power – considers the medical case study in particular as an expression of new forms of disciplinary ­authority. This volume scrutinises the changing status of the human case study, that is, the medical, legal or literary case study that places an individual at its centre. With close reference to the dawning of

in A history of the case study
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symposium. For an overview, see Abi McNiven, ‘Critical Medical Humanities Symposium – Review’. Available online at http:// medicalhumanities.wordpress.com (accessed 6 February 2014). 73 Joan Scott, ‘History-Writing as Critique’, in Jenkins et al. (eds), Manifestos for History, pp. 19–39. 74 See Sheila Jasanoff (ed), States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and the Social Order (London: Routledge, 2004). 75 On the co-production of biological and ethical norms, see Jasanoff, ‘Making the Facts of Life’; Giuseppe Testa, ‘More than Just a Nucleus: Cloning and the

in The making of British bioethics
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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing

what is particular and what is more universal about nursing’s uptake and development in different countries, but also enables us to explore different methodological approaches 1 Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins to the subject, as has already been the case with the fast-developing field of ‘medical humanities’ for some time. This multifaceted view of colonial and post-colonial nursing, therefore, brings together contributions from scholars working in different disciplines and from a variety of perspectives, geographical, historiographical and, to some extent

in Colonial caring
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, applied for the Bursar’s job on the understanding that numeracy was not essential and that literacy, while no hindrance, was not actually required. He believed in management with good humour and an open door (‘I never ended up a row without telling the other person a funny story’, a technique learned from his former mentor, Professor Walter Schlapp) and appealed to Arthur Armitage, who was not the blandest of Vice-Chancellors, as an eccentric but shrewd character rather than a grey administrator. Dr Beswick had been a medical student in Manchester during and after the

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
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, 22 September 1923, pp. 499–503, at p. 502–3. 30 Reyn, ‘Discussion’, p. 502. 31 See Tania Woloshyn, ‘ Patients Rebuilt: Dr Auguste Rollier’s Heliotherapeutic Portraits, c . 1903–1944 ’, Medical Humanities , 39:1 (2013), 38–46. Rollier insisted, in both the English and French versions

in Soaking up the rays