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Post-Humanitarianism

Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

Mark Duffield

behaviour relating to household savings, energy consumption, educational priorities, mental and physical productivity and maternal and child health ( World Bank, 2015 : 2). Taken together, these factors are important for the reproduction of the cheap, territorially immobile, low-level sensorimotor skills ( Joshi, 2017 ) that drive the vast informal economies of the global South. Mind, Society, and Behaviour emphasises in several places that cognitive techniques cost relatively little, need not be complex and are already widely practised in

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The Changing Faces of UNRWA

From the Global to the Local

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

identified by social workers’ Selection criteria: no men aged 19–60 female-headed households over-60s 1994 Change: stopped mental health programmes Reason given: mental health programmes no longer considered beneficial since they are ‘clinical rather than community-based’ 1995 Change: stopped supplementary feeding programmes To

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When the Music Stops

Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

Stephen Hopgood

the ICRC is really the first human rights organisation ( Hopgood, 2013 : chap. 2). We can point to different emphases – the law versus medicine, justice and accountability versus crisis and need – but common to both these strategies for normative action is a commitment to the physical and mental integrity, the existential moral dignity, of all human beings whoever they are and whatever they have done. This is distinctively modern, and liberal, and still something of a heresy in many Western societies let alone beyond. It is only if one shares this

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Edited by: Penny Bee, Helen Brooks, Patrick Callaghan and Karina Lovell

This handbook is written for patients and members of the public who want to understand more about the approaches, methods and language used by health-services researchers. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is now a requirement of most major health-research programmes, and this book is designed to equip these individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary for meaningful participation. Edited by award-winning mental-health researchers, the book has been produced in partnership with mental-health-service users and carers with experience of research involvement. It includes personal reflections from these individuals alongside detailed information on quantitative, qualitative and health-economics research methods, and comprehensively covers all the basics needed for large-scale health research projects: systematic reviews; research design and analysis using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; health economics; research ethics; impact and dissemination. This book was developed during a five-year research programme funded by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) called Enhancing the Quality of User Involved Care Planning in Mental Health Services (EQUIP). The handbook clearly outlines research practices, and gives an insight into how public and patient representatives can be involved in them and shape decisions. Each chapter ends with a reflective exercise, and there are also some suggested sources of additional reading. People who get involved in health research as experts from experience now have a textbook to support their research involvement journey.

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Changing anarchism

Anarchist theory and practice in a global age

Edited by: Jonathan Purkis and James Bowen

This book attempts to convey the different sociological contexts for how contemporary anarchist theory and practice is to be understood. It concentrates on the issue of broadening the parameters of how anarchist theory and practice is conceptualized. The book compares the major philosophical differences and strategies between the classical period (what Dave Morland calls 'social anarchism') and the contemporary anti-capitalist movements which he regards as being poststructuralist in nature. It also documents the emergence of the now highly influential anti-technological and anti-civilisational strand in anarchist thought. This offers something of a challenge to anarchism as a political philosophy of the Enlightenment, as well as to other contemporary versions of ecological anarchism and, to some extent, anarcho-communism. The book further provides a snapshot of a number of debates and critical positions which inform contemporary anarchist practice. The specific areas covered offer unique perspectives on sexuality, education, addiction and mental health aspects of socialisation and how this can be challenged at a number of different levels. The fact that anarchism has largely premised its critique on a psychological dimension to power relations, not just a material one, has been an advantage in this respect. Ecological anarchism, which has been the driving force behind much contemporary anarchist theory and practice, has been committed to thinking about the relationships between people and 'nature' in new ways.

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Andrew C. Grundy

carers and family members, and other members of the public can be involved in these different research stages, and demonstrate the impact that this involvement can have. Examples of different ways of involving and engaging public members in research studies are drawn from the Enhancing the Quality of User-Involved Care Planning in Mental Health Services (EQUIP) research programme. Learning objectives By the end of this chapter you should be able to: 1. Understand the different stages of the research process 2. Understand the impact of Patient and Public Involvement in

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James Bowen and Jonathan Purkis

Part 1I Doing The following four chapters provide a snapshot of a number of debates and critical positions which inform contemporary anarchist practice. The specific areas covered offer unique perspectives on aspects of socialisation – sexuality, education, addiction and mental health – and how this can be challenged at a number of different levels. Each of the contributors comes from a specialist professional or activist background (rather than an established academic one), and to varying degrees the chapters bear out points made in Part I, ‘Thinking’ regarding

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Psychometrics

Designing and road testing new measurement scales

Patrick Callaghan

project developed a good quality PROM for assessing user and carer involvement in care planning, the first such measure of its kind in mental health. 83 BEE (RESEARCH) PRINT.indd 83 11/05/2018 16:15 This chapter will examine the origins of measurement scales in research by considering the science of psychological testing. In particular the chapter will provide a brief definition of a measurement scale, outline why scales are used, examine the design and evaluation of scales, discuss what the responses to scales mean, outline advantages and limitations of their use

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Series:

Bonnie Evans

Disrupting the welfare state’s ‘bonds of love’ If the Children Act 1948 and the publication in 1955 of the Underwood Report of the Committee on Maladjusted Children were significant moments in the formation of government policy towards children based on the Tavistock Model of Human Relationships, then the Mental Health Act 1959, the 1970 Local

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Series:

Bonnie Evans

administrative systems also meant that very little was known about the occurrence of all forms of ‘mental handicap or behaviour disorders generally’. Furthermore, limited resources meant that priority was often given to what were ‘quantitatively more pressing developmental problems such as malnutrition, infectious diseases, blindness and deafness’. 15 These were strong findings of health