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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

, top-down re-design’ ( ibid .: 61). If the aim is for organisations to flexibly adapt to the changing requirements of permanent emergency, such a top-down redesign would, in any case, be a contradiction in terms. Instead, within A Design Experiment , we can see something different. Building on progressive neoliberalism’s questioning of professional hierarchies, organisational boundaries are also now dissolving and liquefying ( Bauman, 2000 ). Touch points, which vary according to the nature of the emergency, the mindsets of managers and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

a majority of humanitarian practitioners, we can define it as a commitment to three things: the equal moral worth of all human lives (i.e. non-discrimination on principle), the moral priority of the claims of individuals over the authority claims of any collective entity – from nations to churches to classes to families – and a belief that as a moral commitment (one that transcends any sociological or political boundary) there is a just and legitimate reason to intervene in any and all circumstances where human beings suffer (even if

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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British Army sisters and soldiers in the Second World War

Negotiating nursing explores how the Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service (Q.A.s) salvaged men within the sensitive gender negotiations of what should and could constitute nursing work and where that work could occur. The book argues that the Q.A.s, an entirely female force during the Second World War, were essential to recovering men physically, emotionally and spiritually from the battlefield and for the war, despite concerns about their presence on the frontline. The book maps the developments in nurses’ work as the Q.A.s created a legitimate space for themselves in war zones and established nurses’ position as the expert at the bedside. Using a range of personal testimony the book demonstrates how the exigencies of war demanded nurses alter the methods of nursing practice and the professional boundaries in which they had traditionally worked, in order to care for their soldier-patients in the challenging environments of a war zone. Although they may have transformed practice, their position in war was highly gendered and it was gender in the post-war era that prevented their considerable skills from being transferred to the new welfare state, as the women of Britain were returned to the home and hearth. The aftermath of war may therefore have augured professional disappointment for some nursing sisters, yet their contribution to nursing knowledge and practice was, and remains, significant.

. Shifting work and gender boundaries As nurses extended and expanded their work beyond the ‘normal’ remit of nursing practice,7 the gender and professional boundaries between medicine and nursing blurred. On active service overseas nurses increasingly ‘stood in’ for their medical colleagues as the exigencies of war demanded. One sister, part of the BEF evacuating Marseilles in June 1940, wrote that the colonel of her unit asked her about the medical fitness or otherwise of the patients: ‘He said he could not find the M.O. to ask him. I gave my opinion.’8 Sister Mary

in Negotiating nursing
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Literary satire and Oskar Panizza’s Psichopatia criminalis (1898)

’S PSICHOPATIA CRIMINALIS Bauer remarks that Psichopatia criminalis does not always succeed in ‘remain[ing] within the boundaries of satire, and sometimes descends to a direct polemic against the politics of its addresses’.3 The following analysis agrees with Bauer’s assertion that Psicho­patia criminalis pushes the workings of satire to its dystopian limits and questions the comprehensibility of intent in Psichopatia criminalis from the reader’s point of view. It considers whether Panizza’s Psichopatia criminalis was indeed conceptualised as a satire and, as such, whether

in A history of the case study
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project. The College and its leading figures were keen proponents of structured general practice and shared care schemes, and received support from significant specialists in the field. Moreover, they collaborated with the other Royal Colleges, and with specialists in the BDA, to create guidelines and conduct service reviews of new programmes, highlighting how shared interests could transcend professional boundaries. The coalescing of these institutions around technologies of management suggests that this period saw the emergence of new visions of

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
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Winifred Dolan beyond the West End

’ (Witz, 1992: 47) that influenced the opportunities afforded to women in white-collar professional spheres, including theatre management, by the final decades of the nineteenth century. This is a useful concept in relation to Dolan’s experience, as obvious restrictions were Past the memoir ­73 placed upon opportunities for her own professional progress. More specifically, sociologist Anne Witz notes: Gendered strategies of demarcationary closure describe processes of inter-occupational control concerned with the creation and control of boundaries between gendered

in Stage women, 1900–50

married and left the nursing profession, although some returned later in life when their children had grown up. A few went abroad to nurse, and at least two died young. The only testimony to identify both a satisfying professional career and a long and happy 168 Reasserting work, space and gender boundaries married life is that of Sister Catherine Hutchinson. Previous histories of allied military nurses have argued that they did not wish to return to hospital nursing because of its petty restrictions.2 None of the testimonies in this book articulates this specifically

in Negotiating nursing
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Conclusion From the mid-­1930s, with the growing inevitability of another war, civilian nurses clamoured to join the QAs and TANS.1 Female nurses were keen to demonstrate their skills in healing men for the war effort and to create a space for themselves as an essential part of the military medical services. The impetus for their eagerness to join the war was as much about caring for the men as it was about their personal and professional development. Sister Penny Salter wrote of the ‘remarkable men I had the privilege to nurse’,2 and Sister Brenda McBryde of

in Negotiating nursing
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Managing diabetes, managing medicine

diabetes were as numerous as those from all infectious diseases put together’ during the 1930s, and estimates of the condition's prevalence rose steadily over the post-war period. 3 Likewise, medical professionals regularly referred to increases in workload and escalating consultations for the disease during the 1970s and 1980s; new technologies and understandings of risk management had extended the boundaries of treatment, whilst greater life expectancy and disease detection buttressed changes of demography, employment, leisure, and diet that probably underpinned

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine