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This book can be described as an 'oblique memoir'. The central underlying and repeated themes of the book are exile and displacement; lives (and deaths) during the Third Reich; mother-daughter and sibling relationships; the generational transmission of trauma and experience; transatlantic reflections; and the struggle for creative expression. Stories mobilised, and people encountered, in the course of the narrative include: the internment of aliens in Britain during the Second World War; cultural life in Rochester, New York, in the 1920s; the social and personal meanings of colour(s). It also includes the industrialist and philanthropist, Henry Simon of Manchester, including his relationship with the Norwegian explorer, Fridtjof Nansen; the liberal British campaigner and MP of the 1940s, Eleanor Rathbone; reflections on the lives and images of spinsters. The text is supplemented and interrupted throughout by images (photographs, paintings, facsimile documents), some of which serve to illustrate the story, others engaging indirectly with the written word. The book also explains how forced exile persists through generations through a family history. It showcases the differences between English and American cultures. The book focuses on the incidence of cancers caused by exposure to radioactivity in England, and the impact it had on Anglo-American relations.

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2: Provincial matters Thirty years before Richard Hoggart lived in Rochester, Kathleen McEnery Cunningham presided at the centre of a lively cultural scene there. In 1914, she had married Francis Cunningham, then secretary and general manager of James Cunningham, Son and Company, a luxury coach- and car-making company. She was probably introduced to Cunningham by his cousin, Rufus Dryer, a good friend of hers in New York and, like her, an artist and a student of Robert Henri at the Art Students League a few years earlier. Before her marriage, she lived in New

in Austerity baby
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Jane Eyre in Elizabeth Stoddard’s New England

3 Gothic legacies: Jane Eyre in Elizabeth Stoddard’s New England Anne-Marie Ford ‘What do you think of those scenes in Jane Eyre where she watches with a professional eye the rising of [Rochester’s] passional emotions, and skilfully prevents any culmination of feeling by changing her manner? – Did anybody ever notice it?’1 These questions come from a letter, dated 5 May 1860, to the American writer and critic James Russell Lowell, from an aspiring New England writer, Elizabeth Drew Barstow Stoddard. Lowell had recently accepted one of Stoddard’s short stories

in Special relationships
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in California. And (not so trivial) living in the least beautiful apartment I’ve ever had. Was it time to blame everything on America instead? hH At about the time of my revisionist thoughts, I reread Richard Hoggart’s account of his year in the United States. By coincidence, he spent this year (1956–57) at the University of Rochester, where I taught for a decade, after I left California. Earlier, and just over ten years after his stay in the United States, I knew him for a while at the University of Birmingham, where I was a postgraduate student in sociology

in Austerity baby
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Cousins and the changing status of family

’s marriage proposal and its basis in his desire for respectability, instead marrying Rochester in a celebration of mutual love. Critics such as Eugenia C. DeLamotte point to the novel as having a ‘domestic’ ending with a sexually tamed husband. 114 I argue in contrast that the novel’s conclusion emphasises the role of the sexual desires between Jane and Rochester in creating a kinship bond

in Gothic incest
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P. Baldwin, Contagion and the State in Europe, 1830–1930 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999).  7 D. Brunton, The Politics of Vaccination: Practice and Policy in England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland, 1800–1874 (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2008

in The politics of vaccination
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destroy their partnership. For me, the story starts in Rochester, New York. Austerity baby hH When I interviewed Elizabeth Holahan in Rochester in 2002, she told me that Kathleen McEnery had made small portraits of her and of her sister Margaret. She told me a little about her sister, who died quite young and who, she said, had had a warm friendship with McEnery’s husband, Francis Cunningham. Margaret is the rather frail-looking young woman in a checked dress. I didn’t know – there was no reason for her to mention it – that she had two other sisters (and, I think, a

in Austerity baby
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West Indian intellectual

, the planter class having undoubtedly gone native in terms of moral character, and very likely having interbred as well. 36 They could no longer be regarded as wholly white, and certainly not as truly English. White creole women were reputed to be even more corrupt than the men. As Rochester had said of Bertha in Jane Eyre , in the words Jean Rhys would echo many years later in Wide Sargasso

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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, so that he might adorn his sect with worthy emblems. In a footnote to the text of his Commentary Cochlaeus recalls that most of his book had been written at Meissen by the year 1534. Then he recounts how, at the urging of Dr Jerome Verall, Archbishop of Rochester and Apostolic Nuncio, he added the brief chapters covering the years 1535–47 at Regensberg and published the Commentary in 1549. But Cochlaeus’s real cue to update and publish his fifteen-year-old manuscript may have been the appearance in 1548 of Melanchthon’s vita of Luther. After the Reformer’s death a

in Luther’s lives

Philosophy and Wit’66 as the main scoffers, but it seems likely that some of the doubters were close to the very top of the social scale. Hobbes’s ‘wit’ was regarded by some of his critics to be a kind of gateway drug that would eventually lead those exposed to atheism,67 but he had an aristocratic patron who presumably cannot have found his views offensive. The earl of Rochester, too, was undoubtedly both a wit and a sceptic about witchcraft (and much else besides). Rochester was also involved in the theatre, sometimes as more than just an audience member: he adapted John

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681