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A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

humanitarian sector can develop formal (and fruitful) collaborations with academic historians and to integrate some of their methods into their work practices. Humanitarian History and Policy The impetus for this project came from a growing interest in history within the aid industry. The humanitarian sector’s engagement with its past has expanded significantly since the beginning of the twenty-first century, typified by the Overseas Development Institute’s five-year ‘Global History of Modern

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

practice of humanitarian governance, wearables must be understood in the context of the technology-focused humanitarian innovation agenda, as well as of the general trends of the humanitarian sector. A culture shift has taken place regarding the permissibility and necessity of private-sector collaboration to achieve success. The optimism – sometimes unrealistic – about technology which pervades the sector means that digital humanitarian goods are routinely hailed as ‘game

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Felix M. Bivens

for the common good. Many students at all levels are drawn to Chiapas because of the notoriety of the Zapatista movement. The Human Development programme provides them with an infrastructure for their social service placements; approximately 100 students per year contribute. Moreover, the programme has developed its own degree programmes. Some of these are academic degrees and others are diploma programmes designed for local development practitioners and other indigenous community leaders. This fits in with another overall goal of the programme, which is to ‘create

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussière

research is identified by research conducted with the partners or the communities, rather than about the partners or the communities. Here, it is important to distinguish partnership from collaboration. Collaboration limits the role of participants to ‘facilitating the collection of data, the recruitment of subjects, access to archives, access to statistics’ (Simard, 2001, free translation from French), and aims to create the conditions required by the researcher in a given milieu. In contrast, partnership implies greater involvement of practitioners in the entire

in Knowledge, democracy and action
A global perspective
Nirmala Lall

different forms. In one community–university research partnership – Chantier de l’Économie Sociale Trust (Fiducie du Chantier de l’économie sociale) – academic, professional and practitioner expertise were partnered to create a research locus for research projects or self-directed training opportunities. Throughout the project, research was conducted collaboratively by both researchers and practitioners to mobilize and co-construct knowledge. According to Denis Bussières, author of the case study: 93 MUP_Hall.indd 93 30/07/2013 17:16 knowledge, democracy and action

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Mandakini Pant

11 Mobilizing and strengthening knowledge for sustainable development in India Mandakini Pant University–community partnerships are based on the understanding that: (a) academics/researchers, practitioners (CSOs) and community members share a commonality of purpose for effecting sustainable development by producing knowledge to be used for the practical purpose of policy change and developmental interventions, contributing to theoretical elaboration and empowering communities through knowledge dissemination; and (b) they can be complementary to each other in

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Felix M. Bivens

26 Innovative teaching and learning programmes from the CDRC Felix M. Bivens Context The Citizenship Development Research Consortium (CDRC) is a UK Department for the International Development-funded group of university- and NGO-based researchers working together for almost a decade, examining concepts and practices of citizenship in diverse contexts across the globe. Much of the research carried out by this collective falls within the PAR and CBR traditions, involving collaborations between university academics and those active in communities and civil society

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Experiences from higher education institutions
Felix M. Bivens

. (2003a) point to three distinct dimensions of CBR: (1) collaboration between academics and community members; (2)  legitimation of multiple modes of knowing in the creation and dissemination of the knowledge created; and (3) a normative goal of social change. CBR can be understood as a union of two important traditions within higher education which have sought to make university resources and capacities available for community needs. The first, participatory action research (PAR), has long sought to make the research capabilities of HEIs accessible to marginalized

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
Martin D. Moore

the temporality and content of clinical activity in order to integrate dispersed labour. Amid professional and popular anxiety about the quality of British medical practice, elite specialists and GPs also developed the first national guideline and audit systems, designed to inform local care and structure national provision. In doing so, these practitioners incorporated previously academic tools for research and healthcare assessment into routine care. Moreover, acting through statutory bodies associated with the NHS and the standard-setting bodies of the Royal

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Lessons from case studies from the South and North
Rajesh Tandon and Edward T. Jackson

2 Building blocks of partnerships: lessons from case studies from the South and North Rajesh Tandon and Edward T. Jackson It is said that practice makes perfect. Indeed, we are convinced that it is only by doing community–university partnerships that engaged academics, reflective practitioners, progressive policymakers and innovative funders can both understand and strengthen this approach to mobilizing knowledge for livelihoods, sustainability and democracy. While, as Paolo Freire showed, action and reflection are two mutually reinforcing and dialectical

in Knowledge, democracy and action