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Anarchist theory and practice in a global age

This book attempts to convey the different sociological contexts for how contemporary anarchist theory and practice is to be understood. It concentrates on the issue of broadening the parameters of how anarchist theory and practice is conceptualized. The book compares the major philosophical differences and strategies between the classical period (what Dave Morland calls 'social anarchism') and the contemporary anti-capitalist movements which he regards as being poststructuralist in nature. It also documents the emergence of the now highly influential anti-technological and anti-civilisational strand in anarchist thought. This offers something of a challenge to anarchism as a political philosophy of the Enlightenment, as well as to other contemporary versions of ecological anarchism and, to some extent, anarcho-communism. The book further provides a snapshot of a number of debates and critical positions which inform contemporary anarchist practice. The specific areas covered offer unique perspectives on sexuality, education, addiction and mental health aspects of socialisation and how this can be challenged at a number of different levels. The fact that anarchism has largely premised its critique on a psychological dimension to power relations, not just a material one, has been an advantage in this respect. Ecological anarchism, which has been the driving force behind much contemporary anarchist theory and practice, has been committed to thinking about the relationships between people and 'nature' in new ways.

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-technological and anti-civilisational strand in anarchist thought. This offers something of a challenge to anarchism as 22 Part I Thinking a political philosophy of the Enlightenment, as well as to other contemporary versions of ecological anarchism and, to some extent, anarcho-communism. Millett, like Moore, identifies a psychological and psychoanalytic dimension to understanding authority, alienation and history, which is a powerful and still underacknowledged aspect of contemporary anarchism. Purkis addresses similar issues in his chapter, but from the perspective of the

in Changing anarchism
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Stirner, anarchy, subjectivity and the art of living

anarchy and established its significance within modernity, yet in her account anarchism emerges as a seemingly uniform doctrine. The reasons for this are not hard to detect. A survey of the anarchist figures who are namechecked – notably Kropotkin, Goldman, Berkman, De Cleyre and Reclus – suggests that the focus of Hamilton’s essay is effectively anarcho-communism. The Stirnerian individualist strand within classical anarchism does not appear within Hamilton’s discussion of the discourse of anarchy, Stirner, anarchy, subjectivity and the art of living 59 despite the

in Changing anarchism
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which there would be a total withdrawal of labour by a united working class. The economies of the advanced capitalist states and their associated governmental apparatus would thereby be subverted. A new society would emerge on the basis of these syndicates, or ‘workers’ unions’. Notably, anarcho-syndicalism played a significant role in Spain during the Civil War (1936–39). ‘Anarcho-communism’ was a

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Core historical concepts reconsidered

-Marxist’ thinker Otto Bauer, who, after the Austrian revolution, was Austrian minister for foreign affairs and socialisation for a short time in 1918–19, ‘guild socialism transmitted the historical experience of English democracy’ and its characteristic system of local self-government ‘from the political to the social area’. Bauer developed his own concept of socialisation. It was strongly inspired by the main assumptions of guild socialism, although he did not copy it in every detail. He conceived of industrial democracy and not Russian-style war communism or the dictatorship

in In search of social democracy