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Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

example, deploying its own forces and resources to assist those in states sympathetic to its foreign-policy goals? This strikes at the heart of the failure of R2P and the ICC. Humanitarian action and human rights rely on a disparity of power, not on reciprocity, because they ultimately require the capacity to act against sovereignty if necessary – that is, against the wishes of the sitting government. The belief after 1991 that the possibility now existed permanently for sovereignty to become conditional on international normative approval lies at

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

community mutuality and gender inclusion ( Becker, 2004 ). Through such progressive reinscription, the informal sector has been repackaged through projects like ‘Bottom of the Pyramid’ economics ( Prahalad, 2006 ) or ‘inclusive capitalism’ as an eligible and eager development and business partner. Consider, for example, UNDP’s (2008) homely appraisal of NGO-assisted informality as a low-cost welfare infrastructure for an inclusive capitalism. It points out that where poverty prevails, formal rules and regulations are often less effective

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The international growth and influence of bioethics has led some to identify it as a decisive shift in the location and exercise of 'biopower'. This book provides an in-depth study of how philosophers, lawyers and other 'outsiders' came to play a major role in discussing and helping to regulate issues that used to be left to doctors and scientists. It discusses how club regulation stemmed not only from the professionalising tactics of doctors and scientists, but was compounded by the 'hands-off' approach of politicians and professionals in fields such as law, philosophy and theology. The book outlines how theologians such as Ian Ramsey argued that 'transdisciplinary groups' were needed to meet the challenges posed by secular and increasingly pluralistic societies. It also examines their links with influential figures in the early history of American bioethics. The book centres on the work of the academic lawyer Ian Kennedy, who was the most high-profile advocate of the approach he explicitly termed 'bioethics'. It shows how Mary Warnock echoed governmental calls for external oversight. Many clinicians and researchers supported her calls for a 'monitoring body' to scrutinise in vitro fertilisation and embryo research. The growth of bioethics in British universities occurred in the 1980s and 1990s with the emergence of dedicated centres for bioethics. The book details how some senior doctors and bioethicists led calls for a politically-funded national bioethics committee during the 1980s. It details how recent debates on assisted dying highlight the authority and influence of British bioethicists.

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Conclusion While she became associated with British bioethics following her engagement with IVF and embryo research in the 1980s, Mary Warnock is better known today for her views on euthanasia.1 Warnock first engaged with this issue in 1993, when she was appointed to a House of Lords Select Committee that investigated whether there were circumstances in which ‘assisted dying’ might be permissible, when a doctor would not be prosecuted for ending a patient’s life or helping them end their own lives. After deliberating for a year, Warnock and her fellow committee

in The making of British bioethics
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Literary satire and Oskar Panizza’s Psichopatia criminalis (1898)

an assistant doctor for prominent ∙ 92 ∙ LITERARY SATIRE AND OSKAR PANIZZA’S PSICHOPATIA CRIMINALIS Munich-based psychiatrist Bernhard von Gudden (1824–86), who was formerly a director of the Zurich Burghölzli clinic (1870–72) and then of the Oberbayrische Kreisirrenanstalt (1872–86).9 Gudden died in 1886, under mysterious circumstances: shortly after being appointed personal physician to Bavaria’s King Ludwig II, and declaring the latter mentally incompetent to rule, both Gudden and the King were found dead in Lake Starhemberg; it is possible that Gudden was

in A history of the case study

This course within the philosophy department draws students from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, biology, pre-medical and anthropology, as it explores the complexities of end-of-life issues. Students engage with local community members through a series of workshops where issues such as euthanasia, brain death and right-to-die laws are discussed. Information about the views of rural communities is collected and the underlying values systems are explored. Students also assist community participants in filling out living will documents and related video

in Knowledge, democracy and action

advisory service staff, and they may hire additional staff at their own expense. As is the case with committee staff members in the United States, the parliamentary advisory staff assist party group members in many ways and are an important part of the working groups, committees, and the legislative process in general.13 The party group leader is usually the most prominent member and the spokesperson for the party in parliament. He or she may be overshadowed by the prime minister or some ministers if the party is supporting the government, but if the party is in

in The Länder and German federalism

publisher in Samuel Fischer, who published his first work, in 1916 – about the Wu-wei resistance movement, Die drei Sprünge des ∙ 158 ∙ Alfred Döblin’s literary cases about women and crime Wang-Lun (The Three Leaps of Wang-Lun) – and subsequent novels until 1933. Döblin was in good company, since S. Fischer was also the publishing house of Germany’s two other great writers of the era, Gerhart Hauptmann and Thomas Mann. But unlike Hauptmann, who had been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1912, and Mann, who was its recipient in 1929, Döblin’s fame was largely

in A history of the case study
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The discovery, commemoration and reinterment of eleven Alsatian victims of Nazi terror, 1947– 52

   Human remains in society were young Alsace-​Lorrainers who had died as forced recruits in the Wehrmacht and SS.4 Alsace was a key geographic centrepiece in the Franco-​German rivalry that spanned the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. In 1871, 1914 and 1940–​44 France and Germany turned the province into a battlefield in a literal military sense during times of war and an ideological battleground of competing national narratives during times of peace. The results of the three different conflicts saw Alsace change sovereignty four times between

in Human remains in society

documents from the Commission and the Council of Ministers, since the Bundesrat now receives these. The federal government also sends its materials directly to the Bundesrat which transfers them to the Land Missions that are now in Berlin. Where necessary or useful, the Observer now sends materials to the Bundesrat. Since the SEA, the Observer has focused more on Brussels, and his offices in Bonn were closed in 1999. He continues to gather relevant information, assist the Länder with the organization and explanation of materials sent to the Bundesrat, report on the

in The Länder and German federalism