Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

, potentially, an escalation of violence ( Collinson and Duffield, 2013 : iv, 19–22). Furthermore, several authors argue that the increasing resort to hard security measures and fortified aid compounds has led to the ‘bunkerisation’ of aid and the paradox that aid agencies gain or maintain access in insecure environments at the same time as (especially expatriate) personnel are distanced from those they seek to assist ( Collinson and Duffield, 2013 ; Duffield

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada and Róisín Read

humanitarian situations ( Champy, 2018 ). The precursors to these studies included those of Mark Duffield, who in a seminal article denounced the ‘bunkerisation’ of NGOs ( Duffield, 2010 ) and then, alongside Sarah Collinson and others, the ‘paradoxes of presence’ ( Collinson et al ., 2013 ). However, the exchange of field practices remains limited and the academic and policy critique of security practices does not seem to have had the impact it warrants. It is largely to this gap in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs