and the impartiality with which they were being provided – monitoring that required resources and a new type of arrangement. Duty of Care From 2012 to 2016, security management also incorporated a legal dimension, as the organisation could be held liable if an incident harmed an employee. . The question of legal risk came up at MdM in July 2010, thanks to enactment of the External Action of the State law and the map of officially discouraged red zones. That law enabled lawsuits against NGOs entering red zones if they fell victim to an incident requiring government

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

could face a public backlash and even state prosecution if they were to reveal transactions with criminal organisations and terrorists. Lastly, there is no benefit in making abductions an issue of public debate. Pirates and other criminal groups do not care about their image or public pressure, while jihadist groups like al-Qaida openly acknowledge relying on kidnappings for money. These are the reasons regularly brought up by humanitarian and security circles to justify keeping past cases secret. They are not entirely without basis. It would clearly be inadvisable to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

sometimes actively distinguish themselves from others with the same legal status ( Sutton, 2018 ). The legal obligations inherent in the notion ofduty of care’, and the risk of legal action against agencies that fail in their duty of care, have shaped staff-security strategies ( Edwards and Neuman, 2016 ). They may explain why harder security measures, greater recourse to evacuation and a more forward-looking approach focused on assessing and managing risks characterise staff-security strategies as compared with civilian-protection strategies. They may also explain some

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles

pragmatic approach, where our only duty would be to implement the most appropriate methods and skills – that is, an ‘obligation of means’ and the use of process. Such technical requirements are meaningless without an ethical framework: knowing who should be included and excluded from aid programmes and being able to explain it; worrying about being more useful to the powers that be than to the population; and paying attention to anything that might contradict the initial assumptions. These challenges regarding humanitarian organisations’ specific responsibilities have no

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

would create such abject living conditions (akin to Agamben’s ‘bare life’: Gordon, 2018 ) that Palestinians would be forced to accept what Trump and his administration have denominated the ‘deal of the century’ ( Gordon, 2018 ; Wong, 2018 ). Far from being motivated by an ‘ethics of care’ to protect displaced and dispossessed people, or a quest to secure a democratically grounded ‘liberal peace’, this ‘great deal’ can be identified as a quintessentially neoliberal project. Driven neither by ethics nor humanitarian principles, this is an

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

McBryde’s published memoir written nearly 50 years after the end of the Second World War. It is therefore prone both to relating the dramatic interventions required to engage a readership, and the nostalgia invoked by nurses when they considered their wartime lives. Nevertheless, it demonstrates the new surgical work that nurses expected to encounter as part of their overseas duties. Student nurses who trained between 1939 and 1945 cared for civilians injured by enemy bombing campaigns and combatants evacuated back to Britain from war zones. Thus, even before overseas

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Mirrors of French ideals?

him from keeping a close eye on affairs outside his immediate sphere of government: ‘Although bishops might be bound to care within certain limits, that one calls the diocese . . . they do not however lose the care of the church in general, for the good of which they must work with all their strength.’51 Episcopal communion was vital, cautioned Camus, but so too was ecclesiastical unity, and bishops had a duty to foster both as far as possible.52 It was true, Noulleau declared, that a bishop could occasionally leave his diocese, but only for its spiritual benefit or

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)

particular sense of pathos. Salter wrote of an encounter with the RAF in Karachi and the squadron leader’s decision to give a party for the sisters, despite the duty officer forbidding it: ‘“Who did they think they were these young airmen”… but these men could not have cared less, they had nothing to lose, except maybe their lives shortly when being shot up over the jungles of Burma.’110 Wilson was posted to a hospital near Piraeus and noted that the RAF was stationed close by: ‘They were just young boys, eager and enthusiastic. One by one they went on flights and never

in Negotiating nursing

9 Paternalistic Care and Transformative Recognition in International Politics Fiona Robinson In this chapter, I address what Uma Narayan described in 1995 as ‘the self-serving collaboration between elements of colonial rights discourse and care discourse’ ( 1995 : 133). Narayan argues that, in

in Recognition and Global Politics
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Their basis and limits

criticisms. Section 1 explores two approaches to rights – the interest-based (IB) approach, and the obligation-based or Kantian view. Both are shown to offer coherent justifications that can avoid turning all political concerns into a matter of rights. Section 2 then compares the ways they relate to other social duties. It shall be argued that only the Kantian approach fully escapes the second criticism by positively requiring that

in Political concepts