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Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

knowledge gap regarding the development and deployment of wearables in emergencies, where there are deep, extra-democratic power differences between beneficiaries and structurally unaccountable humanitarian actors, donors and private-sector actors. This article suggests that humanitarian wearables have a structural dimension that risks being overlooked when the deployment of ‘wearables for good’ is framed as ‘technical’ and/or ‘good – rather than political. Most scholarship on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

partners, coordination groups and other relevant actors ( Sphere Association, 2018 : 71). Conducting training for local service providers and providing documentation in local languages are also recommended. Numerous groups are engaged in projects to increase the quality and reach of crisis translation. For interpreting (the spoken act of translation), the InZone project demands recognition. 2 InZone has pioneered innovative approaches to multilingual communication and higher education

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

Open Access (free)
Incest and beyond

. Catherine Spooner, Contemporary Gothic ( 2006 ) 1 This book has sought to bring to light the variety of incestuous configurations in the Gothic. In order to do this, I have relied not only on existing literary scholarship, but also on a broad methodological approach that includes anthropological, political, philosophical, legal and

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Old things with new things to say

artefacts and in the scholarship that has circled those lives. At the same time, this is not a conversation that can be easily contained by human discourse; when we talk with things, something always has eluded, and always will elude us. The fact that Anglo-​Saxon writers and craftsmen so often employed riddling forms or enigmatic language balances an attempt to speak 217 Afterword: Old things with new things to say 217 and listen to things with a tacit recognition that these nonhuman wihtu often elude, defy and withdraw from us. What are the outcomes of this study of

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Open Access (free)

once said, their eyes on the prize. The prize, of course, is a more just, sustainable, joyful and loving world. Based what we have learned from on our work together in this project, we offer our thoughts on an agenda for the future. Emergence of a new architecture of knowledge: beyond experiments and pilot projects Our study provides evidence that, at a global level, we are moving from the tradition of engaged scholarship based largely on the work of a number of committed individual scholars and their personal connections to community to a new, institutional approach

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)

educational system.2 In her thorough study of reforms and revolts in the university world during the long 1960s, Anne Rohstock has presented a complex picture of this situation. She maintains that a strong sense of crisis spread during the period around 1960. There was a widespread belief that there was an alarming educational deficit, a Bildungsnot. According to this belief, West German science and scholarship were dysfunctional and incapable of living up to their ideals; this was considered to be particularly true of the university. That was something many people could

in Humboldt and the modern German university

openness to everything connected with science and scholarship, art, and music, he remembered. Eduard Spranger, the philosopher and educationalist, praised the students he met in the late 1940s. They were the most earnest and dedicated he had ever known.3 The university was one of the first societal institutions that were allowed to resume their activities after the surrender of Nazi Germany in May 1945. Much had changed, however. In a very tangible sense, the outcome of the Second World War had transformed the academic terrain. The loss of the eastern territories meant

in Humboldt and the modern German university
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic

nature of family bonds underpinning representations of incest and not only allow for a greater range of relationships to be understood as incestuous, but also reveal that the Gothic engaged with wider understandings of marriage and family than previously thought. Scholarship on the Gothic that relies on Stone’s teleological narrative of family rather than the new insights provided by more recent social

in Gothic incest
The permeable clusters of Hanna Rydh

, an association to promote women with a university education (Fridh-Haneson and Haglund, 2004). This dual-strategy position can be seen in Hanna’s written work. In her explicit archaeological endeavour she, in tandem with her colleagues, was engaged in projects towards a modern, scientific and scholarly discipline. However, in her popular texts (e.g. Rydh, 1926b) she developed research that differed from mainstream scholarship and was more in line with her feminist interests – as early as in 1927 she used the word ‘feminist’ to characterise herself (Rydh, 1927: 11

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology