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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

lifestyles and making good choices, while in the South, a post-humanitarian ethic has disaggregated, medicalised and reduced precarity to the basic nutritional, energy, health, sanitation, education, financial and psychic requirements needed to maintain bodily functioning ( Jaspars, 2015 ). Everywhere, resilience, or the injunction to endlessly adapt before unmediated market and environmental forces, has become the zeitgeist of late-modernity ( Evans and Reid, 2014 ). As the uncertainty of active unemployment becomes the global work norm, the chronically

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

looming environmental disasters. Domestically, the liberal social contract is coming apart in many Western states as the coalition of those who have not benefited from the decades of wealth accumulation after 1979 turns to populist politicians and looks for scapegoats, with experts, immigrants and Muslims seen as prime targets. The commitment to liberal institutions that create limits to the scope of political competition – rights, the rule of law, freedom of the press – and to the basic level of respect due to all persons, be they citizens or refugees

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

For over five decades, the Cold War security agenda was distinguished by the principal strategic balance, that of a structure of bipolarity, between the United States (US) and the Soviet Union (USSR). This book seeks to draw from current developments in critical security studies in order to establish a new framework of inquiry for security in the Middle East. It addresses the need to redefine security in the Middle East. The focus is squarely on the Arab-Israeli context in general, and the Palestinian-Israeli context in particular. The character of Arab-Israeli relations are measured by the Israeli foreign policy debate from the 1950s to the 1990s. A dialogue between Islam and Islamism as a means to broaden the terrain on which conflict resolution and post-bipolar security in the Middle East is to be understood is presented. The Middle East peace process (MEPP) was an additional factor in problematizing the military-strategic concept of security in the Middle East. The shift in analysis from national security to human security reflects the transformations of the post-Cold War era by combining military with non-military concerns such as environmental damage, social unrest, economic mismanagement, cultural conflict, gender inequity and radical fundamentalism. By way of contrast to realist international relations (IR) theory, developing-world theorists have proposed a different set of variables to explain the unique challenges facing developing states. Finally, the book examines the significance of ecopolitics in security agendas in the Middle East.

management in local governance, economic growth and to prevent further damage to environment and natural resources. In 2006, Bukidnon State College, now Bukidnon State University (BSU), responded to the challenge by signing a memorandum of agreement with Tanggol Kalikasan (TK), an NGO, to assist local policymakers and upland volunteers in increasing their capacity to sustainably manage natural resources within their territories. In line with this plan, BSU Institute of Environmental Governance (IEG) was established to carry out programmes aimed at providing the needed

in Knowledge, democracy and action
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plants have led to wide-ranging environmental degradation and acidification. Close to the smelters, the forest is completely dead. According Air pollution control Figure 6.2 Approximate forest damage zones in the vicinity of Monchegorsk and Nikel and the visible-damage zones on the Kola Peninsula and in Finnish Lapland Source: AMAP (1998). 149 150 International environmental agreements in Russia to the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme’s report on the state of the Arctic environment (AMAP 1997), the forest-death area around Monchegorsk covers 400

in Implementing international environmental agreements in Russia
How to make sense of responses to environmental problems

by those motivated, above all, by economic goals. Those adopting a dark-green position are also more likely to recognize the various inequalities relevant to environmental issues (Maguire et al ., 2002 ). These include both intergenerational inequalities, whereby future generations are impacted by the environmentally damaging activities of the present day, and inter-species inequalities, which pertain to the impacts of human behaviour on ‘voiceless’ non-humans such as flora and fauna. Ultimately

in The greening of golf
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Approaching golf and environmental issues

-related environmental issues. It is also well known that some chemicals that were previously used on golf courses (e.g. DDT) came to be seen as ‘too risky’ for use when considering the health of non-humans and/or humans, and have therefore been outlawed (see Chapter 5 ). In this way, it is widely acknowledged that golf-related activities are potentially damaging to the environment. Differing views still exist, however, when it comes to questions about what has been ‘proven’, and what remains in doubt, in

in The greening of golf

interest’ against that of other sectors. The major 1987/88 Environmental Bill spoke of a new strategy: ‘A successful environmental management presupposes that care for the environment is integrated into the development plans for different sectors of society . . . [who have] . . . a responsibility to prevent new environmental damage’ (Cabinet Bill 1987/88:85, p. 35 f.). The Ministry for Energy and Environment established in 1987 was to have ‘an offensive and co-ordinating role within the Cabinet’; it should instil environmental aspects into other policy sectors, and thus

in Sweden and ecological governance
Professionalization and post-politics in the time of responsible golf

and compliant way. In the final section of this chapter, however, we also provide a more critical assessment of the professionalization strategies described herein. We reflect especially on professionalization’s ideological function at this time: in positioning golf industry representatives as leaders in the environmental movement, professionalization tactics have served to elevate golf’s version of environmentalism to a ‘leading’ (i.e. hegemonic) position as well. We employ the aforementioned

in The greening of golf
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2543Chap1 16/7/03 9:56 am Page 1 1 Introduction In the prelude to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the oil industry was united in its opposition to binding climate targets. All major oil companies took the position that action on global warming could be damaging to their economic interests since the oil industry earns its livelihood from oil, gas and coal – the main sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. Ten years later, the positions of many oil companies have changed completely. Major European multinational oil

in Climate change and the oil industry