Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

Emergency Medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of seeking innovation in medical humanitarianism but advocates to aim for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday practice at home. In this, Tony is also critical of the term ‘humanitarian space’, as it by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada and Róisín Read

, Humanitarian Policy Group ( London : Overseas Development Institute ). Duffield , M. ( 2010 ), ‘ Risk-Management and the Fortified Aid Compound: Everyday Life in Post-Interventionary Society ’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding , 4 : 4 , 453 – 74 . Fast , L. ( 2014 ), Aid in Danger: The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

looking on that the catastrophe has been contained . It is a kind of quarantine effect, whereby what frightens observers is the idea of uncontrolled, ongoing, unpredictable suffering. Humanitarians arrive to create a moment of ‘new normal’ where the flow has been stemmed, the hole plugged. The Ebola response is an example of this – the vast cost in life and suffering and the everyday life experiences of West Africans in the communities affected are all but invisible now because the breach was contained. What normal does is obscure and disguise

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

), ‘ Biosensing in Context: Health Privacy in a Connected World ’, in Nafus , D. (ed.), Quantified: Biosensing Technologies in Everyday Life ( Cambridge, MA : MIT Press ), pp. 79 – 100 . OCHA ( 2013 ), Humanitarianism in the Network Age: Including World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2012 , https

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

opens the chapter describing Australia as a country in which the use of digital technology is part of everyday life for most people. This situation can be construed as a scenario in which both human and non-human actors establish a network, characterised by symmetry between the social and the technical ( Latour, 1999 , 2005 ). Leung relies on actor–network theory to reject the binary conceptualisation of humans and technology. The analytical power of actor–network theory is, however

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

practical and focused on everyday life, with thoughtful and humanistic ambitions. The projects were based on a simple idea: not to construct new shelters but to improve the empty office buildings that lay empty across Vienna after the financial crash. The walls of the bright white pavilion were illustrated with simple photographs, quotations and publications describing the approach, transforming dull grey offices into liveable accommodation by focusing on furniture and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Author: Louise Amoore

Bringing fresh insights to the contemporary globalization debate, this text reveals the social and political contests that give ‘global’ its meaning, by examining the contested nature of globalization as it is expressed in the restructuring of work. The book rejects conventional explanations of globalization as a process that automatically leads to transformations in working lives, or as a project that is strategically designed to bring about lean and flexible forms of production, and advances an understanding of the social practices that constitute global change. Through case studies that span from the labour flexibility debates in Britain and Germany to the strategies and tactics of corporations and workers, it examines how globalization is interpreted and experienced in everyday life and argues that contestation has become a central feature of the practices that enable or confound global restructuring.

The case for practice theory
Matthew Hanchard

science. Digital maps and anchored time 155 This chapter argues that a practice theory approach, centring on how digital maps are used in everyday life, can contribute to the cartographic repertoire. Beginning with a sketch of cartographic theory from academic cartography to date, discussion places contemporary cartographic theory in context. This sets the scene in order to identify a historical limitation in cartographic theory that a practice theory of digital maps could address; namely, the wider anchoring of social practices. The following section provides an

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

social change is needed if everyday spheres such as work, family, consumption and leisure are to be understood as key realms of globalising social relations. Orthodox IPE perspectives – conceiving of opposed realms of state and market, domestic and international, and of power and knowledge as resources – have rendered invisible precisely those realms of social life where the meanings of globalisation are constituted. This book has engaged in some reflection on the dominant ways of thinking that have shaped IPE’s research agenda. I have asked how particular readings of

in Globalisation contested
Acceptance, critique and the bigger picture
Anne B. Ryan

life. Savings are at an all-time low and credit card debt at an all-time high, especially among people under thirtyfive.1 Everyday life is often experienced as harried and fraught. Media discussions often portray Irish society as increasingly similar to that in the United States, and often assume that ordinary people have little choice regarding the shape of their lives.2 However, significant numbers of Irish people have chosen not to engage to this extent with a work–earn–spend culture and are resisting the idea that life must be pressured. They are critical of the

in The end of Irish history?