Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

Emergency Medicine and founder of UK-Med, an NGO that provides international emergency humanitarian medical assistance and which hosts the UK International Emergency Trauma Register (UKIETR) and UK International Emergency Medical Register (UKIEMR). He questions the usefulness of seeking innovation in medical humanitarianism but advocates to aim for the same duty of care that one would offer in one’s everyday practice at home. In this, Tony is also critical of the term ‘humanitarian space’, as it by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada and Róisín Read

, Humanitarian Policy Group ( London : Overseas Development Institute ). Duffield , M. ( 2010 ), ‘ Risk-Management and the Fortified Aid Compound: Everyday Life in Post-Interventionary Society ’, Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding , 4 : 4 , 453 – 74 . Fast , L. ( 2014 ), Aid in Danger: The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

looking on that the catastrophe has been contained . It is a kind of quarantine effect, whereby what frightens observers is the idea of uncontrolled, ongoing, unpredictable suffering. Humanitarians arrive to create a moment of ‘new normal’ where the flow has been stemmed, the hole plugged. The Ebola response is an example of this – the vast cost in life and suffering and the everyday life experiences of West Africans in the communities affected are all but invisible now because the breach was contained. What normal does is obscure and disguise

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

), ‘ Biosensing in Context: Health Privacy in a Connected World ’, in Nafus , D. (ed.), Quantified: Biosensing Technologies in Everyday Life ( Cambridge, MA : MIT Press ), pp. 79 – 100 . OCHA ( 2013 ), Humanitarianism in the Network Age: Including World Humanitarian Data and Trends 2012 , https

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

opens the chapter describing Australia as a country in which the use of digital technology is part of everyday life for most people. This situation can be construed as a scenario in which both human and non-human actors establish a network, characterised by symmetry between the social and the technical ( Latour, 1999 , 2005 ). Leung relies on actor–network theory to reject the binary conceptualisation of humans and technology. The analytical power of actor–network theory is, however

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

practical and focused on everyday life, with thoughtful and humanistic ambitions. The projects were based on a simple idea: not to construct new shelters but to improve the empty office buildings that lay empty across Vienna after the financial crash. The walls of the bright white pavilion were illustrated with simple photographs, quotations and publications describing the approach, transforming dull grey offices into liveable accommodation by focusing on furniture and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

violence against women, the UN GA emphasised that VAW can be committed ‘in public or in private life.’18 In 2004, the GA specifically addressed domestic violence in a landmark resolution, No. 58/147, which defined DV as ‘violence that occurs within the private sphere, generally between individuals who are related through blood or intimacy,’ and ‘one of the most common and least visible forms of violence against women and [having] consequences [that] affect many areas of the lives of victims.’19 It also described the different forms of DV, including physical

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

Introduction: the narrative Premise and main argument: elaborating the new notion of violence against women’s health Violence against women (VAW) has been the object of hundreds of studies, pertaining to different areas of research. International law has been one of these areas, the analysis focusing on gender-based violence as a violation of human rights, in particular a violation of the principle of non-discrimination, the prohibition of torture, inhuman or degrading treatment, the right to life, the right to respect for private and family life, and on states

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

-based violence that result in, or are likely to result in, physical, sexual, 135 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 135 24/03/2020 11:01 Violence against women’s health in international law psychological or economic harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life’ (Article 3(a), Istanbul Convention). The concept of VAWH can also encompass all acts that cause or are likely to cause harm to women. This book theorises that these acts can be either ‘horizontal’ or ‘vertical

in Violence against women’s health in international law