From Kant to Nietzsche

In 1796 a German politico-philosophical manifesto proclaims the 'highest act of reason' as an 'aesthetic act'. The ways in which this transformation relates to the development of some of the major directions in modern philosophy is the focus of this book. The book focuses on the main accounts of the human subject and on the conceptions of art and language which emerge within the Kantian and post-Kantian history of aesthetics. Immanuel Kant's main work on aesthetics, the 'third Critique', the Critique of Judgement, forms part of his response to unresolved questions which emerge from his Critique of Pure Reason and Critique of Practical Reason. The early Romantics, who, after all, themselves established the term, can be characterized in a way which distinguishes them from later German Romanticism. The 'Oldest System Programme of German Idealism', is a manifesto for a new philosophy and exemplifies the spirit of early Idealism, not least with regard to mythology. The crucial question posed by the Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling of the System of Transcendental Idealism (STI) is how art relates to philosophy, a question which has recently reappeared in post-structuralism and in aspects of pragmatism. Despite his undoubted insights, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's insufficiency in relation to music is part of his more general problem with adequately theorising self-consciousness, and thus with his aesthetic theory. Friedrich Schleiermacher argues in the hermeneutics that interpretation of the meaning of Kunst is itself also an 'art'. The book concludes with a discussion on music, language, and Romantic thought.

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a dialogue with the author. We come to the classic text from within our personal hermeneutic horizons, which colour our reading. Yet this does not mean that we cannot learn from the classic. As German philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer puts it (Gadamer 1960: 184), our ‘preconception’ (Vorurteile) may colour our reading but the process goes both ways, and in the process of reading, our own ‘hermeneutic horizon’ changes as a result of our reading. By engaging with the text we modify our prejudices –and broaden our horizon. It is the latter part of the ‘Hermeneutic

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Entanglements and ambiguities

contradictions and contentions of modernity, ever shaped by configurations of time and space, from the braiding of analytical and hermeneutic orientations to the making of historical anthropology. Anthropology and time For a very long time now, anthropological understandings have displayed varied dispositions toward issues of temporality and history, from willing disregard and uneasy

in Subjects of modernity
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America

phenomenological condition of solitude might be a kind of cultural endowment of the Conquest, religion via liberation theology could hermeneutically construct another collective memory, connecting the living in protest at the violent and disordered past. In this respect, liberation theology should be seen as a modernist movement relating past and present (Lowy, 1996). Liberationists expanded the repertoire of Christianity by stimulating questions of ethics in base Christian communities. Constant reinterpretation of scripture against the backdrop of present-​day conditions put

in Debating civilisations
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Art and interpretation

encountered in the early Romantics, Schelling and Hegel with sustained attention to the role of language in philosophy. Most people are aware that Schleiermacher formulated the first modern account of hermeneutics, but too few people seem aware that this was only part of a wider philosophical project, some of which has now turned out to prefigure central ideas of key thinkers in contemporary philosophy, such as Brandom, Davidson, Gadamer, Habermas, McDowell and Rorty. The appearance of Gadamer in this list might appear surprising, given his critical account of Schleiermacher

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Hamlet, adaptation and the work of following

autonomy it is in one’s power to grant, which means, seen in its own terms’.2 Clearly, Cavell is not seeking a return to an autotelic or self-contained notion of ‘the-text-in-itself ’, much less some spurious sense of original authenticity or immutable literary value. Rather, 132 Readings his interest is linked directly to the originary governance of the work of art and the hermeneutic yield of what he terms ‘our unpredicted reconsiderations of works from any period’. This surplus potential, manifested by the plays’ ‘appropriability’, is perhaps especially evident in

in The new aestheticism
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’s proclamation here is actually closer to the later Heidegger’s hermeneutic insistence upon the Lichtung des Seins, the ‘clearing of being’, which is the never fully articulable basis of the specific sciences, and which Heidegger sees as being manifest to us in language as the ‘house of being’. Without the prior ‘opening up’ or ‘disclosure’ of being, thus without an inherent connectedness of ourselves to a meaningful world which is prior to any attempt to theorise such a connection, any account of a more specific cognitive relationship to being has no basis. Apprehending

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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An introduction

and ambivalence in the recent renovations of anthropology and history, including in the making of historical anthropology. Under discussion throughout are distinct contradictions and contentions of modernity: from the formidable interleaving of analytical and hermeneutic orientations – especially, their competing conceptions of the relationship between knowing/explication and place/location – as

in Subjects of modernity

‘true’ to these concepts, ideas and feelings. This distinction is central to Andrew Bowie’s work. Suggesting that ‘many of the most important philosophical questions lead inevitably to issues connected to art’,4 he argues that, in the hermeneutic philosophical tradition at least, this understanding of truth is intrinsically involved with art via the claim that art reveals the world in ways which would not be possible without the existence of art itself – a version of this view can be ascribed to Schlegel, Novalis, Schleiermacher, Heidegger, Benjamin, Adorno and

in The new aestheticism

. Identity/eye-dentity and the inexorable desire to fix What emerges in the first three novels is a tension between two divergent approaches to interpretation which have given rise to much debate in the Misunderstandings in Desarthe’s novels  fields of semantics and philosophical hermeneutics: on the one hand, an objectivist attitude which sees identity as transparent and univocal; and on the other the view that there can be no purely objective interpretation because of the interpreter’s inability to transcend his own subjectivity when reading the emitter’s signals

in Women’s writing in contemporary France