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Editor’s Introduction

Most mainstream discourses on humanitarian security would not consider the community engagement of a team of anthropologists in three West African countries during the Ebola epidemic of 2014–16 as directly related to security – and their article in this special issue on ‘Security and Protection’ hardly touches on security as its own topic. Instead, it provides a detailed account of the need for a thorough understanding of social relationships when defining, and thus securing, humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles

: Results from a 40-Cluster Household Survey’ , Lafta Riyadh , Al-Nuaimi Maha A. , Burnham Gilbert , PLOS Medicine , 15 : 5 , doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002567 . Moynier , G. ( 1888 ), Les Causes du succès de la Croix-Rouge ( Paris : Académie des sciences morales et politiques ). Neuman , M. ( 2014 ), ‘Review: Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism’ , International Review of the Red Cross , 96 : 894 , 641 – 8 . Neuman , M. and Weissman , F. (eds) ( 2016 ), Saving Lives and Staying Alive: Humanitarian Security in the Age of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

population in contexts of armed conflict is evident in the range of policy statements, handbooks and guidelines ( Global Protection Cluster Working Group, 2010 ; ICRC, 2008 ; InterAction, 2006 ; O’Callaghan and Pantuliano, 2007 ; Oxfam, 2005 ; Paul, 1999 ; Slim and Bonwick, 2005 ). Institutional staff-security policies also began to appear in the 1990s ( Cutts and Dingle, 1995 ; ICRC, 1999 ). In 2000, the Humanitarian Practice Network published a Good Practice Review on Operational Security in Violent Environments (hereafter, GPR). Concerned not only with the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

Editor’s Introduction

even those inspired by anti-communism were cautious about structural integration into Western security strategies. At the beginning of the 1990s, NGOs shrugged off their scepticism for the morality of state power, working more closely with Western military forces. Private and government funding for humanitarian operations increased. With the help of news media, humanitarian agencies boosted their political capital, presenting themselves as providers of public moral conscience for the West. A new political economy of humanitarian aid developed

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

History Security-risk management has long been a concern at Médecins du Monde (MdM), as it was for other humanitarian agencies operating at the height of the Cold War. However, it was in the 1990s that security had to address its own set of issues. The collapse of the Soviet bloc and the post-Cold War conflicts created safety issues for humanitarian agencies: a booming aid sector led to an increase in exposure, together with a trend for humanitarian organisations to shift from working on the periphery of conflicts to the heart of them. Yugoslavia, Chechnya

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector

three interlocking themes: the militarisation of intervention in the post-Cold War era and the redefinition of humanitarianism that accompanied it; the period following the withdrawal of UN staff from Somalia in 2001 and the questions it raised about the relationship between the international humanitarian sector and those it is charged to help; the shifting discourse of humanitarian action in the twenty-first century, particularly the normalisation of crisis and displacement and the recurrent themes of food security, famine and drought. Each session was introduced by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

of humanitarian and human rights organisations to actively involve themselves in crises and complex emergencies worldwide under the sometimes explicit, often implicit protection of Western hegemony. This all came to an end with the intervention in Libya of 2011. On the face of it, getting China and Russia to abstain from using their veto on the security council must have seemed like a diplomatic coup. But in reality, this was a trigger for greater Chinese assertiveness. The blocking of effective action on Syria at the security council, including

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

keeping abductions secret once the hostages have been freed is just as debatable. According to most security experts, 6 aid organisations will only encourage other kidnappers to go after them if they publicly announce staff abductions, particularly when the kidnapping is resolved by a commercial transaction. Unless they adopt a systematic and intransigent policy of not negotiating with kidnappers, 7 humanitarian organisations will have to hide any transactions that led to the release of their colleagues. This white lie is all the more necessary since aid organisations

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

). Betts , A. and Bloom , L . ( 2014 ), ‘ Humanitarian Innovation: The State of the Art ’, in OCHA Policy and Studies Series ( New York : United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs ). Boltanski , L. and Chiapello , E . ( 2005 ), The New Spirit of Capitalism ( London and New York : Verso . Original edition , 1999 ). BOND ( 2003 ), Joint statement by members of the International Global Security and Development Network on the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), ‘A

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs