Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 186 items for :

  • knowledge democracy framework x
Clear All
Open Access (free)

When the Music Stops

Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

Stephen Hopgood

, interests, and conceptions of the good, and seeks a framework of rights that will enable us to realize our capacity as free moral agents, consistent with a similar liberty for others’ ( Sandel, 1984 : 4). What this means in relation to the liberal state is clear. As John Gray puts it: ‘The sine qua non of the liberal state in all its varieties is that governmental power and authority be limited by a system of constitutional rules and practices in which individual liberty and the equality of persons under the rule of law are respected’ ( Gray

Open Access (free)

The Changing Faces of UNRWA

From the Global to the Local

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

’s #DignityIsPriceless campaign, a series of increased risks are thus being borne by Palestinian UNRWA staff whose employment rights are being undermined both by financial cuts and operational changes. Furthermore, a second related way that ‘self-reliance’ is pertinent to this analysis emerges through the application of an additional lens: the private–public framework. I use this lens and what I denominate a process of ‘privatisation’ to denote the ways that operational changes are increasingly rendering Palestinians responsible for the provision of

Open Access (free)

Knowledge, democracy and action

Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

Series:

Edited by: Budd L. Hall, Edward T. Jackson, Rajesh Tandon, Jean-Marc Fontan and Nirmala Lall

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Budd L. Hall

contributions to the literature. First, its focus is on community–university research partnerships rather than the broader community–university engagement. Second, it is based on a global empirical study of the role of community–university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. Third, we have gone further to frame the contribution of community–university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other

Open Access (free)

Series:

Nirmala Lall

to investigate their form and function in local, regional, national and global contexts. The task of 89 MUP_Hall.indd 89 30/07/2013 17:16 knowledge, democracy and action mapping community–university research partnerships networks and structures began through the work of the Global Alliance on Community Engaged Research (GACER) and continues to be a work in progress (http://mapping.uvic.ca/GACER). Names, faces and places represent a growing number of community–university research networks. Now, a new online interactive map widens access and participation as it is

Open Access (free)

Series:

Peter Burnell

literature has remained gender-blind’ (Waylen 2003: 157). After all, it has been said that ‘if democracy (or lack of it) is something which transcends all human relations, then, surely, relations between the genders lie at the heart of democracy?’ (Allison 1994: 100). Rai’s call (in Chapter 4) to expand our definitions to encompass not only the public but the private sphere chimes with this, offering not so much a view within politics but a view of politics itself. And of course it is true that a case could be advanced for several other branches of knowledge – development

Open Access (free)

Series:

John Narayan

1 Creative Democracy Optimism about democracy is today under a cloud. (LW2: 304) Unfashionable democracy When Dewey published The Public and Its Problems in 1927, democracy had become somewhat of an unfashionable aspiration, with populations in Europe beginning to turn to the extreme Left and Right for their political settlements. In Russia the October Revolution was nearly ten years old, in Italy Mussolini had been in power for three years and in Germany both volumes of Mein Kampf had been published. At home in the United States of America, even the pretence

Open Access (free)

Series:

Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussière

arising from the application of knowledge. Thus, the practitioners participate in the formulation of research objectives. Partnership research implies the ‘the co-construction by a researcher and a practitioner of a research goal’1 (Desgagné, 1997). It is not simply a matter, therefore, of problematizing issues that arise in the field, but of building, together, a research question. 79 MUP_Hall.indd 79 30/07/2013 17:16 knowledge, democracy and action Co-construction of knowledge Practitioners not only define research goals, they also play an active role in the

Open Access (free)

Series:

Geoffrey Wood

division of society into small autocracies between rival groups and individuals contending for resources is not possible or feasible, then the alternative is to ‘work out a framework for mutual toleration’ (Olson 2000a: 134). While a fair number of democracies have not resulted from such spontaneous and autonomous transitions, that is because democratization has been imposed from the outside (for example, the democratization of Italy and Germany after the Second World War), and/or because of the influence of an already-democratic state. In contrast, Marxist theories of

Open Access (free)

Series:

Shirin M. Rai

the private for the public, but it also provides us with a measure for assessing the processes of democratization. It is both a framework of analysis and a methodology for assessing political change. Feminist methodologies Building upon this debate, the second insight that feminist scholars have offered is by paying particular attention to ‘experience’ as an important starting-point of knowledge, which contextualizes the basis of politics itself (Scott 1992). Gender, as social construction of sex, then is reflected in the political roles that women and men are able