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Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

-income countries, late forties, early fifties, they would be helped to some extent by vaccines, but they will usually succumb not to infections but to injury, road-traffic accidents, violence and, in women, complications of labour – and there is a surgical fix to those. I think the innovations in medicine may need to come conceptually and in the way things are presented; in order to understand that you should really focus on outcome. It is a philosophical approach: whether or not you should just do

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War
Xavier Crombé and Joanna Kuper

operations to the new context: the organisation deployed a new team to Bentiu State Hospital to support surgical activities managed by the hospital’s regular staff and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). It also set up a primary healthcare clinic inside the local Protection of Civilians (PoC) site, run and secured by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), where about 8,000 people had sought shelter amid tensions and fear between the different

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings and Lauren Harris

, lactating mothers and TB patients.’ WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) 8.4 million 307,000 1. ‘Improve equitable access to at least basic and safely managed drinking water and sanitation services.’ 2. ‘Raise awareness on public health risks related to water, sanitation and hygiene and promote adequate and equitable hygiene practices at households, education institutions and health facilities paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations.’ 3. ‘Strengthen health emergency preparedness and response capacity

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response
Vincenzo Bollettino and Birthe Anders

could have been more effectively managed. 13. Military actors adhere to the relevant humanitarian civil–military guidelines. (Use MCDA Guidelines for complex emergencies and Oslo Guidelines for natural disasters, or applicable country guidelines.) a) Humanitarian and military actors intentionally adhering/attempting to adhere to applicable humanitarian civil–military coordination standards and guidelines. b) Humanitarian and military actors are clearly not adhering to applicable humanitarian civil–military coordination concepts and principles. c) It is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

. , 2016 ). Digitisation – the collection, conversion, storage and sharing of data and the use of digital technologies to collect and manage information about individuals from affected communities – increasingly shapes understandings of need and the response to emergencies. 2 This use of digital technologies produces ‘digital bodies’ – images, information, biometrics and other data stored in digital space – that represent, track, quantify and monitor the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

non-emergency-related texts for no payment. An unpaid, voluntary innovation became one where translators felt taken for granted or even exploited. If information is a form of aid, then it comes at a cost, just like water, food, medicine and other supplies, and the free provision of information should not be assumed, even in a crisis. Indeed, the long-term needs of the crisis-affected community might be served better by NGOs and other actors providing paid work to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

communities affected by disaster. Following the work of organisations including the CDAC Network, Internews and BBC Media Action, we know that this is a vital form of aid: people need information as they need water, food, medicine and shelter. Information can save lives, build resilience, support livelihoods and empower ( Hannides, 2015 : 9). Information provision should be prioritised within all humanitarian responses. In addition, international journalism about humanitarian disasters needs financial support. This content is incredibly important but

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

, improving customer value and effectively managing competitive risk ( Keohane, 2013 ; Quitzau, 2010 ; Tidd et al. , 2001 ). There are many parallels between the evolution of innovation practice within the private sector and that of the humanitarian sector. Chesbrough (2006) used the term ‘open innovation’ to explain the shift in the way companies had been innovating. Historically, businesses attempted to internalise the creative and innovative process, funding large research

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

-chain authentication as a means of managing aid and work entitlements ( Dodgson and Genc, 2017 ). Solar power lighting and charging solutions are widely marketed together with portable ceramic water filtration systems ( Redfield, 2015 ). Replacing a need for medically-staffed feeding centres, take-away mother-administered therapeutic foods to tackle malnutrition are now common ( Scott-Smith, 2013 ). Making good the paucity of health and educational services, e-medicine and e-learning smart phone apps are being widely trialled. While these are only a few of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.