Open Access (free)

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Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

Open Access (free)

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Toby Fricker

the rapid influx of people, the Jordanian government opened Za’atari refugee camp in late July 2012, with support from the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organisation, United Nations agencies and other partners. 3 In the harsh conditions of Jordan’s northern desert, Za’atari rapidly became a massive aid operation and at the same time the media face of not only the refugee crisis in Jordan but across the

Open Access (free)

Justin A. Joyce

No Abstract

Open Access (free)

‘Telegenically dead Palestinians’

Cinema, news media and perception management of the Gaza conflicts

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Shohini Chaudhuri

‘perception management’ – a term that I draw from the journalist Mark Curtis – that leads us into an inward, affective engagement through the soldiers’ perspective: what the war did to them , not what they did to others. 2 In a previous publication, I drew parallels between this film and mainstream Western news media, which routinely prioritises the Israeli viewpoint. 3 Now I

Open Access (free)

Liking visuals and visually liking on Facebook

From starving children to satirical saviours

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Rachel Tavernor

The development of social media sites, such as Facebook (founded 2004) and Twitter (founded 2006), has changed humanitarian non-governmental organisations’ (NGOs) media practices and subsequently altered the ways that supporters and publics are engaged. 1 This chapter focuses on a recent movement for NGOs to humour humanitarianism to achieve visibility on social networks

Open Access (free)

The Unknown Famine

Television and the politics of British humanitarianism

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Andrew Jones

The mass media is a critical actor in the global humanitarian system. New communication technologies have publicised and drawn attention to disasters and faraway suffering, collapsing the distance between global North and South, mobilising public empathy and accelerating the growth of international NGOs. 1 The linkages between humanitarianism and the media have been analysed from a range of

Open Access (free)

Selling the lott ery to earn salvation

Journalism practice, risk and humanitarian communication

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Jairo Lugo-Ocando and Gabriel Andrade

Regarding the need of an effective humanitarian communication that can politically assist mobilisation and public engagement, many scholarly works have focused upon the ability of the news media to create regimes of pity in order to mobilise the public towards humanitarian causes. 1 Some authors have gone further to say that if audiences are passive and uninterested, sometimes the media have to

Open Access (free)

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Laura Suski

and intensive model of parenting, affects a more universal and collective call for a global international humanitarianism. While social media provides opportunities to share and discuss information about toy safety, it will be argued that emotion is an important part of humanitarian mobilisation, and that the emotions of consumption are often thwarted by the identity politics of consumption

Open Access (free)

‘The most potent public relations tool ever devised’?

The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s

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Agnieszka Sobocinska

begun to look beyond the bureaucrats, academics and politicians who devised policy, to investigate how the public engaged with international development during the 1950s and 1960s. 4 This chapter extends such work by focusing on the role played by media and popular culture in constructing public images of international development, with particular reference to the United States Peace Corps. The cultural significance of

Open Access (free)

The corporate karma carnival

Offline and online games, branding and humanitarianism at the Roskilde Festival

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Lene Bull Christiansen and Mette Fog Olwig

In humanitarianism the popularising of causes, and the use of celebrities and media culture to do so, is a rising phenomenon. Academic writing on humanitarianism, however, tends to criticise the popular, especially when it is mediated through celebrities. 1 Such critiques often intersect with disapproval of the growing collaboration or crossbranding between humanitarian