Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Richard Parrish

relation to rules governing the transfer of players. Again, not all rules have international implications. Stevenage Borough’s claim against the Football League failed because the League ruling preventing the club entering the Football League from the non-leagues did not affect trade between member states.8 Stevenage had argued that membership of the Football League would enable them to compete for a place in European competitions – a remote prospect (Beloff et al. 1999: 146). Sport and EU competition law 119 Finally, if the activities of sport are covered by Article

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Christopher T. Marsden

: Co-regulation means any form of self-regulation with some sort of external, independent, incentives, oversight or form of backstop [including recognition] of a self-regulatory body by Government, law or a statutory regulator; approval of codes by Government or a statutory regulator; and compulsory membership or funding arrangements. 2

in Network neutrality
Richard Parrish

principles of the four freedoms to be undermined. The belief system of the sociocultural coalition is held together by the logic of positive integration and a commitment to the socio-cultural model of sports regulation. Sport possesses social and cultural characteristics which necessitates a soft touch application of law. Furthermore, the market-based definition of sport adopted by the Single Market regulators conflicts with the socio-cultural coalition’s concern to develop a people’s Europe. Membership of the two advocacy coalitions is wide. The term ‘actor’ refers to

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

. Policy communities tend to have a stable membership, are highly insular and have strong resource dependencies. An issue network by contrast has fluid membership, is highly permeable and possesses weak dependencies (Rhodes 1988, Peterson 1995). Within the context of the EU several policy networks may be in operation, some resembling policy communities, others issue networks. A related realm to that of policy networks is the idea of epistemic communities. Such communities are essentially knowledge based (actual or perceived) and are comprised of experts. Being thus

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

for a judgment by the Arrondissementsrechtbank because the UCI had allegedly threatened to withdraw paced cycle racing from the World Championships (Weatherill 1989). Donà v. Mantero 197618 The second occasion on which the ECJ dealt with a sports-related case concerned nationality rules in Italian football. The Italian Football Federation, the Federazione Italiana del Gioco del Calcio (FIGC) controls the game of football in Italy. Under its rules, players are required to hold a federation membership card. Only the FIGC can issue such a card. Article 28(g) of the

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

Gutiérrez Díaz MEP in October 1991 on safety in professional boxing.9 The third motion suggested that a common logo should be worn by athletes from the 12 Community member states taking part in the Barcelona Olympic Games.10 Written by Mrs Muscardini MEP, the motion recognised the symbolic significance of sport and sought to use this to promote European integration. The common logo would, according to Muscardini, symbolise the athletes membership of the EU as an ideal and unified homeland and as an appeal for democracy for all the people’s of Europe. The fourth motion for

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

full set of rights and interests of personhood begins at birth despite political, religious and humanitarian desires to protect foetal life.’175 Having a status means that it is more than a simple group of cells, as described by the Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Warnock Committee) in 1984,176 but that its interests cannot prevail over those ones of its mother. Birth is the turning point: ‘a cataclysmic event [that] propels the foetus into the context in which it can … be brought into membership with other human beings.’177 Moving to my

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

origin. The Secretary of State for the Home Department granted her leave to remain until she turned 18, and could have extended the period for a further three years on humanitarian grounds. Zainab Fornah asked to be recognised as a refugee. The Court of Appeal held that FGM of ‘young, single and uncircumcised Sierra Leonean women’ does not constitute persecution ‘for reasons of’ their membership of a ‘particular social group’ for several reasons, among which were the fact that ‘however harshly we may stigmatize the practice as persecution for the purpose of Article 3

in Violence against women’s health in international law