Search results

Open Access (free)
From policy to law to regulation

This book explains the beginnings of net neutrality regulation in the United States and Europe, and some of the current debate over access to Specialised Services: fast lanes with higher Quality of Service (QoS). It examines the new European law of 2015 and the interaction between that law and interception/privacy. The book takes a deep dive into UK self- and co-regulation of net neutrality. In each of the national case studies, initial confusion at lack of clarity in net neutrality laws gave way to significant cases, particularly since 2014, which have given regulators the opportunity to clarify their legislation or regulation. The majority of such cases relate to mobile net neutrality, and in particular so-called 'zero rating' practices. The book compares results and proposes a regulatory toolkit for those jurisdictions that intend effective practical partial or complete implementation of net neutrality. It sets out a future research agenda for exploring implementation of regulation. The book outlines competition policy's purpose, referring to the exceptionally rigorous recent analysis of competition law suitability to regulate net neutrality by Maniadaki. Having analysed regulatory tools with little chance of success, it then examines what communications regulators actually do: regulating telecoms access based on the UK case study. The book considers whether zero rating poses a serious challenge to Open Internet use. It explores some of the wider international problems of regulating the newest manifestation of discrimination: zero rating. The book also considers the various means by which government can regulate net neutrality.

Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

own societies, especially as reformists of the centre left and right (Clinton, Blair) came to dominate the party-political scene after Thatcher and Reagan embedded the neoliberal revolution of the 1980s. After the Cold War, in other words, the liberal world order was a fact of life. In Margaret Thatcher’s immortal words, ‘there is no alternative’. The consequences of this focus on private enterprise, mobile money, weakened unions, reduced state welfare and regulation and lower taxes are all too visible today in areas like wealth inequality and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)

Alissa Cooper. 3 While the latter pair of presentations focused on the lack of evidence gathering to prove net neutrality breaches, and the problems created in the technical protocol stack by differing attempts to introduce QoS, my presentation and that of van Schewick focused on the manner in which the BEREC Guidelines needed to clarify Regulation 2015/2120. In particular, we both warned of the danger of

in Network neutrality

analysis of competition law suitability to regulate net neutrality by Maniadaki. Having analysed regulatory tools with little chance of success, I then examine what communications regulators actually do: regulating telecoms access based on the UK case study. This provides insights into how difficult net neutrality regulation will prove in practice, a subject to which we return in Chapter 6 and the concluding Chapter 8 . I then

in Network neutrality

. Sabine Verheyen MEP 1 This chapter first considers the 2013 Proposal and Trilogue in 2014/15, then the 2015 Regulation’s net neutrality aspects, before finally looking at the details of BEREC’s implementation of its Guidelines. European law upheld transparency on a mandatory basis, and minimum QoS on a voluntary basis, under provisions in the 2009 electronic communications

in Network neutrality
Open Access (free)
Neutrality, discrimination and common carriage

Internet Protocol (VoIP, e.g. Skype, WhatsApp) or video (e.g. YouTube, BBC iPlayer or NetFlix) except under narrowly defined conditions. Net neutrality regulation is critical to the future of Internet access for businesses and micro-enterprises, as well as students, citizens and all domestic users – and therefore to the future mass adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing and Big Data. In this book I claim, as

in Network neutrality

/15 legal manoeuvres in both the United States and European Union. Chapter 3 considers Specialised Services in both areas, and then Chapter 4 examines European law in minute detail. Note that as this book is written with Europe as the focus, US regulation is described more briefly. The development of net neutrality regulation US regulation of

in Network neutrality

large extent on the experiences of developed nations, especially the United States, EU and United Kingdom. 16 I focus here on four case studies, beginning with the earliest effective regulation in Chile. This chapter summarises each nation’s development of net neutrality, and focuses on its implementation of regulation against zero rating since 2014. The methodology used both literature review and empirical interviews in the

in Network neutrality
Privacy, liability and interception

replacement, the Privacy Shield, announced in February 2016. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was also confirmed in 2016. 8 Books and articles will be written about such issues in the coming months and years, and the net neutrality blog (chrismarsden.blogspot.com) will refer to them as privacy developments become clearer. Books and articles will continue to be written about various national laws

in Network neutrality

The term ‘Open Internet’ is one that the digital minister, Ed Vaizey and I agreed some years ago was a better term for the UK than the American term – net neutrality. Richard Hooper 1 Regulation of Internet access is a difficult

in Network neutrality