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Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

Introduction The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order, the post-1945 successor to the imperial world of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and the global political and economic system the European empires created. Humanitarian space, as we have come to know it in the late twentieth century, is liberal space, even if many of those engaged in humanitarian action would rather not see themselves as liberals. To the extent that there is something constitutively liberal about

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The churches and emigration from nineteenth-century Ireland

The book knits together two of the most significant themes in the social and cultural history of modern Ireland - mass emigration and religious change - and aims to provide fresh insight into both. It addresses the churches' responses to emigration, both in theory and in practice. The book also assesses how emigration impacted on the churches both in relation to their status in Ireland, and in terms of their ability to spread their influence abroad. It first deals with the theoretical positions of the clergy of each denomination in relation to emigration and how they changed over the course of the nineteenth century, as the character of emigration itself altered. It then explores the extent of practical clerical involvement in the temporal aspects of emigration. This includes attempts to prevent or limit it, a variety of facilitation services informally offered by parish clergymen, church-backed moves to safeguard emigrant welfare, clerical advice-giving and clerically planned schemes of migration. Irish monks between the fifth and eighth centuries had spread Christianity all over Europe, and should act as an inspiration to the modern cleric. Tied in with this reading of the past, of course, was a very particular view of the present: the perception that emigration represented the enactment of a providential mission to spread the faith.

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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

restorative power of travel when combined with an ‘inquisitive mind’ and ‘ardent imagination’. 2 In this, the novel resonates with The old Irish baronet and The tradition of the castle , portraying Delamere and his various movements as the key to a new transnationally inflected Irishness. 3 Roche's novel further reflects on the usefulness of travel in the negotiation of nineteenth-century Irish identities through its exploration of the literary endeavours of its second protagonist, Eugene O’Neil. Presenting

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)

home, or at the highest level of geopolitics in an organisation like the United Nations. From the nineteenth century onwards, a wide range of efforts to formalise the co-operative impulse in the arrangement of social, economic and political relations came to the fore in a response to ameliorate the worst effects released by industrialisation. This book is an attempt to outline a history of one of these formalised efforts attempted in Ireland at the end of the nineteenth century. The history of the co-operative movement in Ireland is one that

in Civilising rural Ireland
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence

5 The spiritual empire at home: emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence The idea that mass migration from nineteenth-century Ireland created an Irish ‘empire’ has had enduring appeal. It proved a rare source of pride during depressed periods in independent Ireland, particularly the 1940s and 1950s, and provided the basis of an evocative title for at least one popular version of the Irish diaspora’s story as late as the turn of this century.1 In the latter context especially, ‘Irish empire’ can appear simply a wry play on a far more common and not

in Population, providence and empire
Community, language and culture under the Celtic Tiger

who speak them.12 There was more than profit at stake, however. In Negri’s terms,13 ‘to say state is only another way to say capital’ – as capitalism develops, the state acts more and more as both the embodiment and representative of capital. The Telecom campaign involved more than an attempt to boost share prices: it also represented the state’s attempt to relegitimise itself, in its new ‘Celtic Tiger’ form, as a ‘shareholder democracy’. The Irish language and political economy By the nineteenth century, Irish was well on its way to becoming a minority language

in The end of Irish history?
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

, it is worth reflecting on deviations from the norm they are seen to constitute – one based, as many of the accepted traits of Irish and British gothic literature of this period are, on relatively few titles, which are themselves, often too simplistically understood. The variety of (non)interactions with Ireland offered by a wider selection of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century texts underlines a much richer, more complex approach to gothic geography than is commonly attributed to Irish writers. Focus on the diversity of settings in

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
The pastoral responses of the Irish churches to emigration

impugn the value of their work, as W. J. Marshall has noted, but it also implies that any improvement, or perceived improvement, 92 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 92 15/09/2014 11:47 Pastoral responses to emigration in opportunities at home would have lessened the number of clergy available to emigrant communities. Indeed, there was a 25% increase in the number of benefices in the Church of Ireland between 1787 and 1832, a factor which helped ensure that, by the early decades of the nineteenth century, the S.P.G., including its Irish auxiliary, was moribund and

in Population, providence and empire
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction

‘romance’, ‘novel’, ‘tale’, and ‘history’. 19 The first part of this chapter explores the ongoing debate over these generic borders and classifications, focusing on Irish gothic literature's frequent uncovering of the porousness of boundaries between fact and fiction, novel and romance – an indeterminacy as socially threatening as the overlap of past and present made manifest in Walpole's Otranto and Leland's Longsword . The second part looks more particularly at examples of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Irish gothic fiction that function as

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
The clergy and emigration in practice

was last known to have resided, seeking information.41 Where communication was maintained, the priest still had a role. The significance of chain migration from nineteenth-century Ireland can hardly be overstated. Satisfactory accounts of previously departed friends and relatives tended to be the greatest encourager of further migration, and the money they remitted was the most common means of financing it, meaning that one ‘pioneer’ emigrant from a locality might be the means of bringing out several more.42 Clergymen were often vital links in this chain

in Population, providence and empire