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Agency in the Finnsburg episode
Mary Kate Hurley

This chapter re-reads the Finnsburg episode of Beowulf as a monument both to the failure of human community and to the human interconnection with outside forces (both human and non-human) that presage and condition that failure. 5 Throughout the episode, we encounter scenes that foreground certain kinds of objects, such as lifeless human bodies and the gold meant to ensure that such corpses will be forgotten. However, the poem also foregrounds the ability of narratives, when circulated, to change the reception of

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Robin Norris

an object lesson that is fundamental to Critical Race Theory. As Delgado explains: [F]alse empathy is worse than none at all, worse than indifference. It makes you over-confident, so that you can easily harm the intended beneficiary. You are apt to be paternalistic, thinking you know what the other really wants or needs. You can easily substitute your own goal for hers. You visualize what you would want if you were she, when your experiences are radically different, and your needs, too

in Dating Beowulf
James Paz

. Ipso quidem tempore, quo intus est, hiemis tempestate non tangitur, sed tamen paruissimo spatio serenitatis ad momentum excurso, mox de hieme in hiemem regrediens, tuis oculis elabitur. Ita haec uita hominum ad modicum apparet; quid autem sequatur, quidue praecesserit, prorsus ignoramus.’ [‘This is how the present life of man on earth, O King, appears to me in comparison with that time which is unknown to us. You are sitting feasting with your ealdormen and thegns in winter time; the fire is burning on the hearth in the middle of the hall and all inside is warm

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
James Paz

Farne, which is in the midst of the sea and surrounded on every side by water.] (III.1) In an analogous passage, Bede emphasises the remoteness of Farne Island in comparison to Lindisfarne: Farne dicitur insula medio in mari posita, quae non sicut Lindisfarnensium incolarum regio, bis cotidie accedente aestu oceani, quem reuma uocant Greci, fit insula, bis renudatis abeunte reumate litoribus contigua terrae redditur, sed aliquot milibus passum ab hac semiinsula ad eurum secreta, et hinc altissimo, et inde infinito clauditur oceano. 149 Assembling and reshaping

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture