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An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse

Med. Caroline Abu Sa’Da is General Director of its Swiss branch. Juliano Fiori: SOS is very much a product of contemporary Europe. It’s a civic response to refugees and migrants in the Med but also to nationalistic politics, or to the return of nationalist movements to the forefront of European politics. How, then, does SOS differ from European humanitarian NGOs founded in past decades? Caroline Abu Sa’Da: SOS is a European citizen movement. Besides our search-and-rescue activities, we aim to give to the greatest number of people access to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector

.1057/ejdr.2008.7 . Médecins Sans Frontières ( 2018 ), Evolution of an International Movement: Associative History, 1971–2014 , 2 volumes, available at http://associativehistory.msf.org/ (accessed 25 July 2018) . Médecins Sans Frontières ( n.d. ), MSF Speaking Out , http://speakingout.msf.org (accessed 25 July 2018) . Miliband , D. ( 2016 ), ‘ The Best Ways to Deal with the Refugee Crisis ’, New York Review of Books , 13 October . Shaw , C. ( 2015 ), Britannia’s Embrace: Modern Humanitarianism and the Imperial Origins of Refugee Relief ( Oxford : Oxford

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

starkly, be allowed to continue as currently constituted) than the other elements of that system. The reason for this should be self-evident: humanitarian action is an integral part of the system; indeed, it can be argued that for at least thirty years, the actions of relief agencies, above all the international private, voluntary ones, have served as the moral warrant for liberal globalisation. Only the human rights movement has been more central in this regard. 1 To be sure, the perceived need for relief NGOs to play this role has diminished over

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

because it has a vital interest at stake. To demand intervention, to open up access, to call for trials all presume that there is, somewhere in the system, the capacity for pressure to be exerted in the name of some degree of accountability. Until 2011, this meant what do the Americans think? They could act or block action. Now China (and under Chinese cover, Russia) have this kind of veto power too. This is obvious in Syria. Assad and Putin have no interest in allowing humanitarians to work, because they are intent on destroying the opposition and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

violence on health facilities and personnel is primarily, if not exclusively, motivated by belligerents’ intent to deprive their enemy and its associated population of access to healthcare ( Rubenstein and Bittle, 2010 ; International Committee of the Red Cross, 2011 ). This article attempts to present a more complex picture and broaden understanding of the issue by providing a detailed narrative of episodes of violence affecting MSF-supported health structures, one that contextualises these violent incidents with regard for the dynamics of conflict in South Sudan as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles

broadened to include the shipwrecked (1906), prisoners (1929) and civilian populations (1949). ‘Additional protocols’ were adopted in 1977, in the wake of the wars of decolonisation and the Vietnam War, to cover ‘irregular’ forces in domestic conflicts. The original ten articles of the first convention have grown to 559 articles in the version currently in force. In other words, they are now a matter for civilian and military legal experts, who have material open to varied and contradictory readings. Let us go back to IHL’s origins, which can give us an idea of how

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

safety of aid-agency staff but also with ensuring safe and continued programming and access, this became known as the ‘bible’ of humanitarian security, and an updated version was published in 2010 ( Humanitarian Practice Network, 2010 ). Several more policy guidelines, manuals and documents focused on staff or staff and agency security have been published at the sector level over the past fifteen years ( DG ECHO, 2006 ; Egeland et al. , 2011 ; EISF, 2018 ; IASC, 2015 ; InterAction, 2015 ). Efforts to keep humanitarian-agency staff and the wider civilian population

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

Open Access (free)
The beast that no-one could – or should – control?

findings should be made accessible to the public. The growth of open access has coincided with a shift in thinking about public involvement in science, from the deficit model of public understanding of science initiatives, which tended to see the issue as one of ordinary people’s lack of knowledge, to the more balanced notion of public engagement (Stilgoe et al., 2014). This makes it tricky to identify the precise effects of open access, which is the aim of this chapter. To set the scene, I will give a brief description of the open-access movement and recent policy

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)

the politics of openness are several answers to this question. One answer lies in our political economy. The shift from familial to corporate capitalism (Fraser, 2015) and the financialisation of capitalism have together solidified the dominance of commercial interests over politics. Corporate actors have easy access to national power centres, to the extent that they co-regulate important national policies (Gamble, 2014). As a result, not only governments but also citizens have lost control over important policy domains such as housing, work and energy (Wagenaar

in Science and the politics of openness