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David Calder

Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space explores how street theatre transforms industrial space into postindustrial space. Deindustrializing communities have increasingly turned to cultural projects to commemorate industrial heritage while simultaneously generating surplus value and jobs in a changing economy. Through analysis of French street theatre companies working out of converted industrial sites, this book reveals how theatre and performance more generally participate in and make historical sense of ongoing urban and economic change. The book argues, firstly, that deindustrialization and redevelopment rely on the spatial and temporal logics of theatre and performance. Redevelopment requires theatrical events and performative acts that revise, resituate, and re-embody particular pasts. The book proposes working memory as a central metaphor for these processes. The book argues, secondly, that in contemporary France street theatre has emerged as working memory's privileged artistic form. If the transition from industrial to postindustrial space relies on theatrical logics, those logics will manifest differently depending on geographic context. The book links the proliferation of street theatre in France since the 1970s to the crisis in Fordist-Taylorist modernity. How have street theatre companies converted spaces of manufacturing into spaces of theatrical production? How do these companies (with municipal governments and developers) connect their work to the work that occurred in these spaces in the past? How do those connections manifest in theatrical events, and how do such events give shape and meaning to redevelopment? Street theatre’s function is both economic and historiographic. It makes the past intelligible as past and useful to the present.

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Introduction

Working memory

Series:

David Calder

on that history as a source of stability even as the group shapes and reshapes it, thereby revealing how unstable it is. This interweaving of authenticity and fakery, of duration and ephemerality, of embodiment and absence, of time and space, makes up the fabric of history, memory, and, of course, theatre. Introduction: working memory 3 This is a book about how street theatre companies and their performances produce postindustrial space. It takes as its objects of analysis the institutions and events of contemporary French street theatre. At its core, this book

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Recuperation

Alternative pasts, sustainable futures

Series:

David Calder

, the towering metal stems of the lamps and the bench bend toward them gently, as if curious; less careful spectators cause the sculptures to jerk aggressively. In this concluding chapter I approach these two installations, Giraud’s Le murmure des plantes 2.0 and Fer à Coudre’s Eclosion floraferrique, because they exemplify contemporary French street theatre’s production of postindustrial space.3 Neither is attached to a specific urban or regional redevelopment project, but through their aesthetics, their work on space and time, and the mode of spectatorship they

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Reincorporation

Putting the countryside back to work

Series:

David Calder

theatre event produce the ‘after but not over’ of the postindustrial in a rural environment that might seem, at first glance, as though it had never been industrial in the first place. Monique de Certaines writes in her history of the town that, ‘Corbigny has never had an industrial vocation.’1 It is true that Corbigny’s industrial history is primarily that of failed twentieth-century factory relocations; the town never developed the prominent metallurgical industries of other Nièvre communities like Fourchambault and Varennes-Vauzelles. The small industrial enterprises

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Resurfacing

Continuous theatre for a creative city

Series:

David Calder

symbolic ownership of the shipyards beyond former 150 Working memories workers to encompass ‘the people of Nantes.’ Such events encouraged residents and tourists to cross the Loire to explore the postindustrial landscape and prepared them for the more permanent appropriation of La Machine. But La Machine also relies on familiar spatial repertoires to encourage particular spatial practices. La Machine and Nantes Métropole tap into the existing repertoires of parks, cafés, and covered shopping arcades to encourage the Naves’ use as public space. They do so both

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Theatre in ruins

Street and theatre at the end of Fordism

Series:

David Calder

cause the summer street theatre festival any more than the summer street theatre festival caused the autumn oil embargo. But the deindustrialization, economic crisis, and urban change that ensued provide more than mere context for the development of French street theatre; they furnished contemporary street theatre with its material and symbolic conditions of possibility. The move away from high modernist urban projects after 1973 signalled a Theatre in ruins 25 return to what David Wiles has called a ‘traditionalist public space’ in which small-scale street

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Excavation

The imaginary archaeology of redevelopment

Series:

David Calder

3 Excavation: the imaginary archaeology of redevelopment Vaulx-en-Velin, May 2012. I have reached the end of the line. I alight from the subway train at Vaulx-en-Velin La Soie, the ‘multimodal’ transit hub that since October 2007 has connected this far-flung eastern banlieue to Lyon city centre. Diffuse light from frosted skylights bathes the underground platform in a soft glow. Warm-toned woods and evenly spaced palm trees set this station apart from the older, workaday concrete models I left behind in Lyon and Villeurbanne. In the years following this visit

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Paper margins

The ‘outside’ in poetry in the 1980s and 1990s

Linden Peach

/90: 4), an observation cited by the editors of The New Poetry (Hulse, Kennedy and Morley 1993: 18) and by Romana Huk in Contemporary British Poetry (Acheson and Huk 1996: 3). It is not the intention of this chapter, however, to survey the richness and diversity of poetry from what Eagleton sees as the new centre. Such a project would require a book in itself and then would probably fail for lack of space. Instead, I want to probe Eagleton’s assumption in the light of some of the trends in poetry and poetry criticism in the 1980s and 1990s, while suggesting, however

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Robert Andersen and Jocelyn A. J. Evans

working class and Catholic labels remained largely synonymous with left and right bloc belonging respectively. Contemporary developments in political space 173 Although the extent of its predictive power has somewhat declined in recent years, left-right ideology still remains of paramount importance. The post-industrial shifts in the 1970s and 1980s which threatened the status quo with radical re/dealignment has in fact settled into a more nuanced but structurally similar competitive framework.2 Even new issues, such as post-materialism, have easily been absorbed in

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The new rural residents

Emerging sociabilities in Alava, Basque Country

Josetxu Martínez Montoya

, and no pilgrimage without priest and party’). Celebrating belonging gathers together aspects of local society concerned with the sharing of daily issues at the bar, playing cards, visiting the ill or the elderly, and celebrating and enjoying the fruits of labour and the land. In the recent past communities were strongly localised, deeply rooted in their territory, in which the control of behaviour and thought, of the use of community space and time was one of the main defining features (Martínez Montoya 1996; 2004). Group solidarity was based on respect of tradition