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Open Access (free)
Female theatre workers and professional practice

Stage women, 1900–50 explores the many ways in which women conceptualised, constructed and participated in networks of professional practice in the theatre and performance industries between 1900 and 1950. A timely volume full of original research, the book explores women’s complex negotiations of their agency over both their labour and public representation, and their use of personal and professional networks to sustain their careers. Including a series of case studies that explore a range of well-known and lesser-known women working in theatre, film and popular performance of the period. The volume is divided into two connected parts. ‘Female theatre workers in the social and theatrical realm’ looks at the relationship between women’s work – on- and offstage – and autobiography, activism, technique, touring, education and the law. Part II, ‘Women and popular performance’, focuses on the careers of individual artists, once household names, including Lily Brayton, Ellen Terry, radio star Mabel Constanduros, and Oscar-winning film star Margaret Rutherford. Overall, the book provides new and vibrant cultural histories of women’s work in the theatre and performance industries of the period.

Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, a new and optimistic, less direct but technologically updated humanitarianism has confidently stepped forth. More de-risked and requiring less professional expertise than the labour-intensive direct engagement of the past, it is a cheaper Western humanitarianism designed for connectivity rather than circulation. Often called humanitarian innovation ( ALNAP, 2009 ; Betts and Bloom, 2014 ), a feature of this new humanitarianism is its enthusiastic embrace of adaptive design ( Ramalingam et al ., 2014 ; HPG, 2018 ). Moreover, unlike autonomous

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

expectation that “now is the time to deliver”’( Sandvik, 2017 : 1) when it comes to innovation. For those humanitarian professionals who engage in innovation because they want to transform the way in which the aid industry works, this presents a challenge. Most such professionals recognise that it is unreasonable to expect ‘innovation’ alone to fix long-standing problems within the humanitarian sector, and equally unreasonable not to expect it to create new problems; but the expectations of the entire

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

; InterAction, 2006 ; O’Callaghan and Pantuliano, 2007 ; Oxfam, 2005 ; Paul, 1999 ; Slim and Bonwick, 2005 ). Institutional staff-security policies also began to appear in the 1990s ( Cutts and Dingle, 1995 ; ICRC, 1999 ). In 2000, the Humanitarian Practice Network published a Good Practice Review on Operational Security in Violent Environments (hereafter, GPR). Concerned not only with the safety of aid-agency staff but also with ensuring safe and continued programming and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

’t necessarily join NGOs like MSF because they don’t have professional experience in humanitarian work. They specifically want to do something in Europe rather than going to Bangladesh or Syria or Iraq. It is really this idea of dealing with a European issue, in Europe, in a way that might bring about political change, without being embedded in a political party. This is a new type of political engagement and politics – different to that which inspired previous generations of humanitarian workers. SOS acknowledges the fact that dealing with migration today in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Emmanuelle Strub

management tools at international programmes and prepare a periodic report for the International Operations Directorate; advise the project teams on managing security incidents and update the security-incident database; support security-management briefings for field teams; and maintain the existing security network and take part in outside meetings. It was a sizeable challenge, given that in 2012 MdM had a presence on every continent, in some forty countries, with 136 international and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

interviews with humanitarian workers indicated that, while social media were used extensively by refugees and migrants to network with family and friends, these platforms were not their preferred channel for receiving information on their situation in Greece, and refugees and migrants expressed preferences for written documents, posters or verbal communication ( Ghandour-Demiri, 2017 ). For these reasons, language and its translation are operational challenges for humanitarian action. The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

humanitarian staff, who wonder why architects so often come up with impractical and top-down approaches even when faced with emergency conditions. This despair, and arguably this misunderstanding, cuts both ways. From my experience interviewing architects for the project, I have found many professionals deeply interested in the topic of emergency shelter but dejected by the way that humanitarianism is organised. They look at the money spent on large-scale humanitarian responses and compare this

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
James Breasted’s early scientific network
Kathleen Sheppard

expedition to Egypt in 1894 as a newly minted Egyptology PhD would be crucial to his career – and he knew it. Not only would the journey provide him with experience in the field, which he needed in order to be considered a true professional Egyptologist, but it would also allow him to build the dynamic scientific network that would aid and sustain his work within Egypt for the next forty years. Scientific networks are essential to the practice of science, both in the field and within institutions. Furthermore, investigating the locations in which scientific networks are

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
The case of Oscar Montelius and Italy
Anna Gustavsson

probably where he first met or heard of several of the scholars who would be a part of his professional network throughout his career. Among the Italians were Luigi Pigorini (1842–1925), at the time the director of the museum in Parma, Giovanni Capellini (1833–1922), Professor at the University of Bologna and Count Giovanni Gozzadini (1810–87) who was involved in the first discoveries at and excavations of the Villanova ‘culture’ near Bologna. It was at the next Congress, in Bologna in 1871, that the Bronze and Iron Ages gained serious attention for the first time.6 The

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology