GP involvement, for instance, emerged in relation to pre-symptomatic disease and prevention, areas of considerable interest to some GPs, especially those connected with academic institutions. By the early 1970s, poor-quality evidence and cost concerns had seen such claims superseded, with GP care entangled in long-held discussions about the unique social, psychological, and clinical skills of GPs. Finally, appeals to preventive risk management returned alongside the themes of practice organisation in the 1980s and 1990s, as bodies like the Royal College of General

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine

History Security-risk management has long been a concern at Médecins du Monde (MdM), as it was for other humanitarian agencies operating at the height of the Cold War. However, it was in the 1990s that security had to address its own set of issues. The collapse of the Soviet bloc and the post-Cold War conflicts created safety issues for humanitarian agencies: a booming aid sector led to an increase in exposure, together with a trend for humanitarian organisations to shift from working

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction

dubbed ‘humanitarian exceptionalism’, the idea that aid workers should be protected at all times and in all places by virtue of the uniqueness of their function and moral standing. In the same year, arguably the apex of the heroisation of humanitarian workers, the UN launched the #HumanitarianHero campaign on 19 August to celebrate World Humanitarian Day ( Neuman, 2017 ). MSF published a multi-author review of its experience in risk management in 2016 ( Neuman and Weissman, 2016 ). In particular, the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

, M. ( 2013 ), Paradoxes of Presence: Risk Management and Aid Culture in Challenging Environments . London : Humanitarian Policy Group/Overseas Development Institute . Cutts , M. and Dingle , A. ( 1995 ), Safety First: Protecting NGO Employees Who Work in Areas of Conflict . London : Save the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

a terrorist organisation like the IS would not be prosecuted ( Dreazen and Jakes, 2015 ). Therefore, while it is advisable to discuss previous cases with discretion, nothing justifies maintaining an information blackout, especially since secrecy hinders improvements to kidnapping prevention and risk management. Appeal for a Minimum Level of Transparency (Rather than Complete Transparency) Rachel Briggs, security researcher and Executive Director of Hostage US, a non

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation

al. , 2014 ) published an evidence-based health-risk and hazard-management blueprint to prepare for climate change. The burden of disability-adjusted life years caused by air pollution in 2010 was 7.6 per cent of all DALYs lost, higher than all twelve other risk factors, including malnutrition, smoking and high blood pressure. The damage to the planet’s physical environment is worsening, and the causes responsible, including urban growth, energy production, primary and secondary

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Building High-tech Castles in the Air?

disasters are a good example of this. Even on a smaller scale, one has only to look to mass-casualty incidents in well-resourced settings. Much as plans and protocols may be in place, the need and requirement of the circumstance pushes the limits of capacity, and therefore it is necessary for healthcare (in needing to deliver the most for the most) to focus much more heavily and widely on the rudimentary stages of casualty management and triage. Certainly, the return to ‘normal’ in well

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

sector sometimes seem to bear down on each new innovation lab. To some extent, this is a problem that we have created for ourselves; the same tide of optimism that previously lifted us up is now receding, and we risk being beached. The limitations of innovation are now clear. Innovation ‘looked at as a process, appears suspiciously like the reforms of yesteryear’ ( Sandvik, 2014 : 27), potentially exposes vulnerable communities to new types of risk, and risks marginalising local aid workers and disaster

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement

as essential to bend the curve. In some instances, community leadership took charge independently by developing ‘indigenous’ strategies to contain the social and physical risks posed by the virus ( Richards, 2016 ). The national and international response architecture also made efforts to ensure ‘local leadership’, primarily by calling on community leaders to mobilise their constituencies around regulations such as safe burial practices. This required

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts

knowledge gap regarding the development and deployment of wearables in emergencies, where there are deep, extra-democratic power differences between beneficiaries and structurally unaccountable humanitarian actors, donors and private-sector actors. This article suggests that humanitarian wearables have a structural dimension that risks being overlooked when the deployment of ‘wearables for good’ is framed as ‘technical’ and/or ‘good – rather than political. Most scholarship on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs