An Interview with Raoul Peck

I Am Not Your Negro (2016) takes its direction from the notes for a book entitled “Remember this House” that James Baldwin left unfinished, a book about his three friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.— their murders, and their intertwining legacies. The film examines the prophetic shadow Baldwin’s work casts on twentieth- and twenty-first-century American politics and culture. Peck compiles archival material from Baldwin’s interviews on The Dick Cavett Show, his 1965 Cambridge lecture, and a series of banal images indexing the American dream. Juxtaposed against this mythology is footage of Dorothy Counts walking to school, the assassination of black leaders and activists, KKK rallies, and the different formations of the contemporary carceral state. Our conversation examines Peck’s role as a filmmaker and his relationship with the Baldwin estate. Additionally, we discussed a series of aesthetic choices he fought to include in the film’s final cut, directing Samuel L. Jackson as the voice for the film, the similarities and shifts he wanted to document in American culture since the 1960s, and some of the criticism he has received for not emphasizing more Baldwin’s sexuality.

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Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

, with the harvest still months away, is being pressed to decide whether to make the long-term investment of sending a child to school. This is happening when there is a hole in the roof, the kerosene has run out and finding clean water is a constant effort. In addition, his neighbour is also expecting reciprocal help with medical bills because the farmer’s family received similar support in the past. For behavioural economics, poverty is an experience grounded in the constant grind of having to make hard choices: educate a child, fix a roof or

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

: University of East Anglia ), http://humanitarian-journalism.net (accessed 28 September 2018) . Semakula , D. et al. ( 2017 ), ‘ Effects of the Informed Health Choices Podcast on the Ability of Parents of Primary School Children in Uganda to Assess Claims about Treatment Effects: A Randomised Controlled Trial ’, Lancet , 390 : 10092 , 389 – 98 , 22 July . Silverman , C. and Alexander , L. ( 2016 ), ‘ How Teens in the Balkans Are Duping Trump Supporters with Fake News ’, Buzzfeed , 3 November

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Race, class and school choice

All in the mix: class, race and school choice considers how parents choose secondary schools for their children and makes an important intervention into debates on school choice and education. The book examines how parents talk about race, religion and class – in the process of choosing. It also explores how parents’ own racialised and classed positions, as well as their experience of education, can shape the way they approach choosing schools. Based on in-depth interviews with parents from different classed and racialised backgrounds in three areas in and around Manchester, the book shows how discussions about school choice are shaped by the places in which the choices are made. It argues that careful consideration of choosing schools opens up a moment to explore the ways in which people imagine themselves, their children and others in social, relational space.

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3 Choice, what choice? Introduction The focus on the question of choice in both policy and rhetoric around schooling can suggest that the parent or carer is king or queen of the process who should have the power to decide on the school their children attend. As we saw in Chapter 1, the neo-liberal concept of choice as an automatic ‘good’, with the parent as an individualistic and rational consumer for their child, has been a driving logic in education policy since the 1980s. Yet, as we discussed in Chapter 2, admission to schooling is generally tied to

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and children navigate the process of applying to secondary schools. Parents1 are presented with an injunction by the state to make a choice for their children’s schooling and education. Since the 1980s, the idea of the ‘choosing parent’ has been paramount in education policy in the UK. Yet the requirement to choose is not necessarily matched by the availability of a range of alternative schools from which to choose. We could see this as part of what Engin Isin (2004) terms the ‘neurotic citizen’ – the citizen who ‘governs itself through responses to anxieties and

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Education Reform Act of 1988 established the ‘independent’ school as the ideal model, achieved through ‘removing the school from local democratic accountability by building on the self-managing school as a business in a competitive market place’ (Gunter and McGinty 2014: 300–1). This further enshrined the concept of ‘choice’ in schooling.1 Choice, diversity and the market model of schooling have continued to shape policies around academies and free schools. This has also been driven by the desire to take schools out of local authority control on the assumption that

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4 Schooling fears Introduction The previous chapter discussed how some parents found the process of choosing schools very stressful. These stresses were expressed by parents from a variety of backgrounds – in terms of both class and ethnicity – and in all areas of the study. Parents in part put this stress down to the frustration at the experience of being given the responsibility to make a choice yet finding that there were only one or two schools to choose between. At the same time, many parents had exercised a choice in terms of where they chose to live

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Negotiating with multiculture

5 Evaluating the mix: negotiating with multiculture Introduction The previous chapters have discussed the ways in which parents’ and carers’ discussion of school choice were infused with concerns about their children’s emotions and also how talking about school choice also frequently raised emotional responses. Chapter 4 focused in particular on ideas of threat and contamination which were produced when thinking of high schools and the presence of classed others. This ‘underclass’ was imagined as gendered, identified by both behaviour in and around the school

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2 Imagining places Introduction This chapter considers the spatial nature of school choice and introduces the three areas in Greater Manchester in which the study took place: Cheadle Hulme, Chorlton and Whalley Range. In the UK, despite the diversification of different types of schools and modes of admission, schooling remains driven by location. Given that ‘choice’ is limited (discussed further in Chapter 3), the clearest way for families to exercise choice over schooling in the public sector is to move to be nearer a desirable school. Every year, newspapers

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