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Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, driven by the neoliberalism of the conservative counter-revolution, this social protection has largely evaporated. Insurance- and company-based social protection has historically been limited or absent in the global South. Late-modern precarity begins here first ( Munck, 2013 ). Encouraged by the imposition of structural adjustment, the South’s informal economies began to rapidly expand from the end the 1970s, absorbing the surplus population thrown off as public-sector employment and services contracted ( Cornia, 1987 ). Moving to catch up, so to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

potential disappearance continue to pervade Palestinian refugees’ experiences and perceptions of UNRWA as the remaining UN agency responsible for Palestinians. UNRWA’s initial three-year mandate as a ‘relief and works’ agency supporting Palestinian refugees residing within its five areas of operation has been renewed for the past seventy years. While continuing to provide ‘works’ and ‘services’ to Palestinian refugees – including in the fields of health, social services, education, microfinance and direct cash emergency programmes – its budget

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

, reinforcing the symbiosis between humanitarianism and the state. The sufficiency of a humanitarian minimum became justification for cuts in public expenditure, particularly as NGOs offered themselves as subcontractors for the provision of essential services at home and abroad. Western governments placed pressure on NGOs to carry out neomanagerial reforms that would promote cultural synergies with their own overseas aid departments, now reorganised according to the business imperatives of the New Public Management. And NGOs used these reforms to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

considering the priority that translation services should receive relative to other pressing needs during a crisis. This discussion of the ethics of crisis translation links to two dimensions of humanitarian ethics more broadly. Ricoeur’s concept of linguistic hospitality suggests how relationships in humanitarian settings often span social, cultural, geographic and linguistic distances, and should be conceived not merely as transactional but through an ethic of exchange that

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

invisible to most of us precisely because they form part of the rules that we play by now ( Eisenstein, 2005 ; Soll, 2014 ). The paradigm shifted before our time, and we recognise it only with hindsight. Such paradigm innovation is however part of the 4Ps model developed by John Bessant and Joe Tidd ( Tidd et al. , 2005 ) and adopted by Elrha’s Humanitarian Innovation Fund to categorise different types of innovation: Product (the products or services which an organisation offers); Process (the ways in which products

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Fabrice Weissman

, which may describe the horrendous conditions in which the hostages are being held and the payment of ransom to criminal and political networks ( Callimachi, 2014a , 2014b ; Kiser, 2013 ). In the end, vital information about the abductions remains the monopoly of the political and criminal networks carrying them out, the aid-organisation crisis units handling them, the private security firms advising them and the intelligence services observing them. Keeping the public and aid workers

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

increasingly encounter media content that blurs the line between reality and fiction. This includes everything from rumours and exaggerations on social media, through to partisan journalism, satire and completely invented stories that are designed to look like real news articles. Although this media content varies enormously, it is often grouped together under nebulous and all-encompassing terms such as ‘fake news’, ‘disinformation’ or ‘post-truth’ media. Scholars have started to pay serious attention to the production and impact of all these forms of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

). None of this complexity is new. The sector has historically responded to emergencies where local conflict collides with weak social systems, high-threat pathogen outbreaks, natural hazard disasters and a shortfall in financial or moral will from the international community to act ( Development Initiatives, 2018 ; Salama et al. , 2004 ). What has changed, however, is the nature of this complexity. It has been inextricably shifted by forces that are beyond the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

practicality prevents it). This is the same foundational commitment that animates human rights work. The humanist core to both of these forms of social practice is a similar kind of belief in the ultimate priority of moral claims made by human beings as human beings rather than as possessors of any markers of identity or citizenship. What differences exist between humanitarianism and human rights are largely sociological – the contextual specifics of the evolution of two different forms of social activism. I have argued elsewhere, for example, that the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

information can also help doctors to decide which patient needs emergency service as the device can provide real-time data. Also, in the case of routine monitoring, a flash memory is added with the device to store the data taken from the human organs. ( Rashid et al. , 2017: 144 ) There is often a disconnect between the technology and its social context. For example, a presentation of several ‘rescue-wearables’ on a trade website

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs