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Russia as ‘a Europe apart’

sense of strategic dissonance between the West and Russia, 10 as the relationship is stuck between a series of longer-term Cold War era problems and new, post-Cold War problems, with each compounding the other. Although cooperative projects have been established, therefore, talk of ‘strategic partnership’ faded in the mid 2000s and an increasing sense of dissonance, even competition, has emerged, as illustrated and emphasised

in The new politics of Russia
Interpreting change

This book focuses on the Western difficulties in interpreting Russia. It begins with by reflecting on some of the problems that are set in the foundations of Russia's post-Cold War relationship with the West. The book points to problems that emerge from linguistic and historical 'interpretation'. It looks at the impact of Russia's decline as a political priority for the West since the end of the Cold War and the practical impact this has had. It then reflects on the rising influence, especially, but not only, in public policy and media circles, of 'transitionology' as the main lens through which developments in Russia were interpreted. The book then examines the evolution of the West's relationship with Russia since the end of the Cold War, focusing particularly on the NATO-Russia relationship. It focuses on the chronological development of relations and the emergence of strategic dissonance from 2003. The book also looks at Russian domestic politics, particularly the Western belief in and search for a particular kind of change in Russia, a transition to democracy. It continues the exploration of domestic politics, but turns to address the theme of 'Putinology', the focus on Putin as the central figure in Russian politics.

Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

is feasible, China and the US will need to see it as in their mutual interest. To protect its people, investments and products, China will need to deploy power over significant distances, giving rise to costly strategic interests and a case for cooperation ( Ikenberry, 2012 ). But China need never again feel forced to follow rules or norms which it does not support. It now has a choice. What consequence in terms of its international reputation or power would follow from it refusing to support the global humanitarian system, instead, for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
‘We’ve moved on’

are morally bankrupt at home and pursue reckless and dangerous international policies abroad. This gap, set in the foundations of relations between the West and Russia in the early 1990s, has grown and is the font of the strong sense of strategic dissonance that increasingly characterises the relationship. The war in Ukraine that began in 2014, the most serious emergency in relations for many years

in The new politics of Russia
Open Access (free)
Reinterpreting Russia in the twenty-first century

: Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea and the aggression in Eastern Ukraine are both attacks on the international rules-based system. In the place of partnership, Russia has chosen the role of strategic competitor … we will maintain our efforts to ensure that the EU remains resolute, robust, united and aligned with the US in the face of this challenge

in The new politics of Russia
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds

crowded into eastern China and Canton demanding similar access. A dissonance of world views had led China and Britain to conflicting purposes and stimulated the move to war with an outcome that completely improved Britain’s strategic position in Asia against its French, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese rivals. For China, the setback was devastating and it heralded the beginning of large-​scale emigration of Chinese labourers to countries in the Asia-​Pacific region. If dissonance produces cultural resistance, distance from alien traditions can be benign in other scenarios

in Debating civilisations
A political–cultural approach

-cultural context of foreign policy does not contradict strategic action and subjective rationality in foreign policy. Indeed, we will not be able to understand the dynamics of how policy-makers reason if we do not acknowledge that human behaviour and intentionality are grounded in both a logic of expected consequences and a logic of appropriateness (Aggestam 1999 : 11–12). The concept of role can provide us with a vital link between the

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy

find productive dissensus between paradigms. A precondition of method is description of the main concept. Paradigms are bodies of thought that are coherent and plausible enough to attract supporters in a general contest of ideas and values. The questions they pose must be sufficiently compelling –​and yet also insufficiently resolved –​to suggest constructive directions for ongoing research. Moreover, competing paradigms will pose arguments to one another, but also exhibit dissonance. They will ‘speak’ past each other, as well as to each other. The critiques and

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory

talents of Polynesian and Micronesian mariners maintained contact between islands and within separate societies. With common Austronesian linguistic roots, communication between and amongst Polynesians and Micronesians generally presented few barriers. Regular and organised visits between islands supported exchanges, as well as communication. Exchange and ritual events, such as the Kula, were simultaneously economic, spiritual, strategic and societal. As represented in Malinowski’s ethnography and Mauss’s reviews in The Gift, the Kula and like rituals incarnated

in Debating civilisations
Irish fiction and autobiography since 1990

:28 AM Page 209 Irish fiction and autobiography since 1990 209 Hamilton’s speckledness, which is purged of its stigmatic associations to become the signifier for an emergent post-national identity in which dissonance and hybridity are regarded as normative, progressive elements: He said Ireland has more than one story. We are the German-Irish story. We are the English-Irish story, too. . . . We don’t just have one language and one history. We sleep in German and we dream in Irish. We laugh in Irish and we cry in German. We are silent in German and we speak in

in Irish literature since 1990