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Globalisation contested

An international political economy of work

Louise Amoore

Bringing fresh insights to the contemporary globalization debate, this text reveals the social and political contests that give ‘global’ its meaning, by examining the contested nature of globalization as it is expressed in the restructuring of work. The book rejects conventional explanations of globalization as a process that automatically leads to transformations in working lives, or as a project that is strategically designed to bring about lean and flexible forms of production, and advances an understanding of the social practices that constitute global change. Through case studies that span from the labour flexibility debates in Britain and Germany to the strategies and tactics of corporations and workers, it examines how globalization is interpreted and experienced in everyday life and argues that contestation has become a central feature of the practices that enable or confound global restructuring.

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Dave Morland

-capitalists, capitalism, globalisation and trans-national corporations are the adversaries most regularly cited. Social anarchists target similar enemies. More importantly, both social anarchists and anti-capitalists stress that a cartography of power relations does not yield a map in which there is one dominant epicentre of power. Anti-capitalism and poststructuralist anarchism 25 Anarchists, old and new alike, insist that power relations saturate multiple networks and must be resisted accordingly. Arguments against hierarchy, inequality and against capitalism itself are abundant

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Moving targets

Rethinking anarchist strategies

James Bowen

fruitful, as argued elsewhere in this volume by Jamie Heckert (chapter 5), to pursue issue-based rather than identity-based political change. Likewise, in order to facilitate inclusiveness, it might well be the case that sometimes we have to adopt forms of action which are not ones we would ideally pursue, and to avoid alienating people with inappropriate ideas, rhetoric and tactics. For instance, socialisation and fear in Britain and Western Europe in recent years has led to often extremely hostile attitudes towards ‘asylum seekers’ which calls for considerable

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Afterword

Monstrous markets – neo-liberalism, populism and the demise of the public university

John Holmwood and Jan Balon

call the ‘eclipse of the public’ is a necessary consequence of the complexity of modern societies that increasingly requires organised expertise of various kinds. In consequence, ‘expert opinion’ would replace ‘public opinion’ and democracy would necessarily be attenuated. Lippmann anticipated that expert opinion would operate in conjunction with the state and economic corporations and, in effect, would be ‘coproduced’ by them. However, it is significant that Lippmann also prefigured what would become another part of the neo-liberal solution; namely, the shift of

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The anarchist travelling circus

Reflections on contemporary anarchism, anti-capitalism and the international scene

Karen Goaman

meeting is heavily sealed off. The demonstration organises itself in different sections, identified by colours denoting the different tactics. For example, the Yellow section consists mainly of the Italian Tute Bianche and the Pink and Silver section consists of a samba band, then recently formed in London, with dancers and people mainly from Britain’s Earth First! and Reclaim the Streets network. One participant describes the Pink and Silver section as ‘like marching along the streets with the contents of your local nightclub crossed with It’s a Knockout and an anarcho

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Conclusion

How anarchism still matters

Jonathan Purkis and James Bowen

a certain extent reproduced on a micro-sociological level, yet in some political cultures, such as those of large northern English cities, issues of tactics, joint participation in actions and the sharing of resources were much more complex (Purkis, 2001). This relationship of dialogue between different movement cultures – one anarchist, the other not – eventually resulted in the decentralist direct action politics of Earth First! and other radical environmental networks actually beginning to influence the direction of their more moderate counterparts. By the late

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Series:

Jon Birger Skjærseth and Tora Skodvin

American Meteorological Society, 77: 9, September 1996, pp. 1961–6, where all the correspondence in The Wall Street Journal on this occasion is reprinted. For a more detailed account of this incident, see Skodvin, 2000b: 215–19. 21 E. Masood, ‘Climate report “subject to scientific cleansing”’, Nature, 381, 13 June 1996, p. 546. 22 E. Masood, ‘Companies cool to tactics of global warming lobby’, Nature, 383, 10 October 1996, p. 470. 23 Personal communication with Brian P. Flannery and Gary F. Ehlig, ExxonMobil Corporation, Irving, Texas, March 2000; Gerry Matthews, Shell

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Heidi Kenaga

of industry public relations was likely more important than that of ‘authentic’ historical chronicle. Despite Forman’s extensive research on the ‘lost’ Pony Express story, he shared screenplay credit with the head of Paramount’s scenario department, Walter Woods. Moreover, director James Cruze – described in one contemporary biographical sketch as having ‘a corporation and

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Shaun Breslin

the West is imposing its values on countries with different historical, philosophical, cultural and political roots. But also real concerns that this thing called globalization is really impinging on sovereignty, or political self-determination. What point is there in voting for one party or another if the fundamental economic strategy of whichever government is elected is shaped by the IMF and the World Bank, or by the investment EAST ASIA 177 and disinvestment strategies of major external corporations and investment brokers? In this respect, there is a real

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Introduction

The autonomous life?

Series:

Nazima Kadir

movements the squatters movement has two faces: “the front stage,” which interacts with the Mainstream, consisting of the state, politicians, the media, and an imagined “public”; and the other, more complicated and perplexing “backstage,” which directs itself towards the internal community, or “the scene.” Presented with a clear enemy, a determinate external Other such as the state, squatters can easily unite to work together using a well-rehearsed repertoire of tactics to reach their goals. But an internal