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Open Access (free)

Duncan Wilson

The international growth and influence of bioethics has led some to identify it as a decisive shift in the location and exercise of 'biopower'. This book provides an in-depth study of how philosophers, lawyers and other 'outsiders' came to play a major role in discussing and helping to regulate issues that used to be left to doctors and scientists. It discusses how club regulation stemmed not only from the professionalising tactics of doctors and scientists, but was compounded by the 'hands-off' approach of politicians and professionals in fields such as law, philosophy and theology. The book outlines how theologians such as Ian Ramsey argued that 'transdisciplinary groups' were needed to meet the challenges posed by secular and increasingly pluralistic societies. It also examines their links with influential figures in the early history of American bioethics. The book centres on the work of the academic lawyer Ian Kennedy, who was the most high-profile advocate of the approach he explicitly termed 'bioethics'. It shows how Mary Warnock echoed governmental calls for external oversight. Many clinicians and researchers supported her calls for a 'monitoring body' to scrutinise in vitro fertilisation and embryo research. The growth of bioethics in British universities occurred in the 1980s and 1990s with the emergence of dedicated centres for bioethics. The book details how some senior doctors and bioethicists led calls for a politically-funded national bioethics committee during the 1980s. It details how recent debates on assisted dying highlight the authority and influence of British bioethicists.

Open Access (free)

Duncan Wilson

Edinburgh Medical Group (EMG), while other groups were established in Newcastle, Sheffield, Glasgow, Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool and Manchester during the late 1960s and early 1970s.77 In addition to giving a paper at a 1967 symposium on ‘Decisions Ian Ramsey and ‘trans-disciplinary’ medical ethics 75 about Life and Death’, Ian Ramsey was involved with the LMG in several ways. As Gordon Dunstan acknowledged, his call for greater engagement with practical issues and collaboration across disciplines influenced Shotter, who ‘began to fulfil what Ramsey knew ought to

Open Access (free)

Series:

Nirmala Lall

individual faculty engaging in transactional and communitybased research partnerships with community created without a systematic institutional support. For example, there are HEIs in which there are no organizational structures such as a centre, office or institute for community-based research or community–university research partnerships to systematically support faculty, community members, groups and organizations in research partnerships. The lack of such a systematic support structure does not preclude the fact that individual faculty and departments engage in

Open Access (free)

Leviathan and the hybrid network

Future Earth, co-production and the experimental life of a global institution

Eleanor Hadley Kershaw

portfolios towards societal need (Lövbrand, 2011: 227), with an additional emphasis on impact of research. This type of rationale has been criticised for its normative assumption that co-produced and transdisciplinary research leads unproblematically to beneficial social solutions (Polk, 2014), and for restricting plurality, deliberation and social-science involvement (Lövbrand et al., 2015). However, the interviews and focus groups conducted for this research revealed a broader range of understandings of co-design and co-production in FE. Some participants saw them as

Open Access (free)

Barbara Prainsack and Sabina Leonelli

reinforces underlying inequalities and benefits one group at the expense of the other. Making science open bears the connotation of democracy and equality, a bit as has been the case with the internet. There has been an assumption for some time that, because everybody in principle has equal access to web-based tools, the internet will make societies more democratic. As is well known by now, the supposed openness and accessibility of the internet has indeed given voice to some people who would not have been heard otherwise, but it has also given powerful actors even more

Open Access (free)

‘A service to the community as a whole’

The emergence of bioethics in British universities

Duncan Wilson

university figures, who praised it as good evidence of the ‘transdisciplinary co-operation’ that was increasingly expected of academics.92 One of CSEP’s co-founders was Mary Lobjoit, a student health physician who had organised the Manchester Medical Group (MMG) since its formation in 1975. Lobjoit had long believed that increased ethics teaching, with input from several professions, was vital to helping medical students become ‘better doctors’.93 She supported Ian Kennedy’s claims that medical ethics should be a ‘central course’ and corresponded with him after his Reith

Open Access (free)

Duncan Wilson

as IVF during the late 1960s and 1970s, and shows how this was led by Anglican theologians. I detail how these theologians argued that ‘trans-disciplinary groups’ were vital to discussing medical ethics, and outline how this formed part of efforts to stay relevant in the face of a decline in religious belief. I outline how theologians such as Ian Ramsey argued that ‘transdisciplinary groups’ were needed to meet the challenges posed by secular and increasingly pluralistic societies, and examine their links with influential figures in the early history of American

Open Access (free)

Alison Mohr

lighting and small appliances. While households undoubtedly gain developmental benefits from access to SHS, the degree to which they address the poverty of household members and their ability to generate an income is far less clear. In response, SONG systems aim to provide additional collective community benefits by the provision of excess energy for small-scale economic activities using, for example, posho (maize meal) mills and egg incubators. SONG is an expressly transdisciplinary project that brings together social scientists, engineers and not-for-profit renewable

Open Access (free)

‘Where to draw the line?’

Mary Warnock, embryos and moral expertise

Duncan Wilson

its Abortion Act in 1967, Foot wrote an article that considered different instances when abortion might be considered permissible.25 But this paper was something of a novelty. While issues such as IVF, euthanasia and organ transplantation were increasingly discussed in ‘trans-disciplinarygroups during the 1960s, most of the philosophers who looked at practical issues did not consider medical ethics to be an important topic.26 They were more concerned with political issues, including the ethics of the Vietnam war, student protests in the United States, France and

Open Access (free)

Deep sustainability

Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality

Kate Rigby

others and our earthly environs, and I explore the potential contribution of literature to this cultural work of ‘deep sustainability’. The ‘transdisciplinary’ research programme advocated by Fischer et al. is modelled by the article itself, which arose from a multi-perspectival workshop on sustainability hosted by the Australian National University’s Fenner School of Environment and Society. Its seventeen co-authors include physicists and ecologists, geographers and engineers, agricultural scientists and conservation biologists, along with the co-founders of Australia