Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Estela C. Itaas Jr. and Benjamin Maputi

The forest land in the province of Bukidnon, Philippines, is continuously declining in terms of its economic and environmental capacity. Acosta called on the government and challenged the academy and other agencies to be more aggressive about measuring the efficacy of government programmes and policies on a range of environmental concerns. Collaborative efforts among the academy, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and local government units (LGUs) have to be pursued to achieve good environmental management in local governance, economic growth and to prevent further damage to environment and natural resources. Bukidnon State University (BSU) Institute of Environmental Governance (IEG) was established to carry out programmes aimed at providing the needed capacity for local executives and local policymakers to better perform their mandate as provided under the Local Government Code.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussière

This chapter seeks to define partnership research. It focuses on evaluation of the partnership research process, an undertaking distinguished from analysis of the larger process in which partnership research takes place. Finally, a partnership research evaluation model, based on the partnership research model developed by the Alliance de recherche universites-communautes en economie sociale (ARUC-ES) and the Reseau quebecois de recherche partenariale en economie sociale (RQRP-ES), was proposed. Partnership research is defined by three essential steps or phases: the co-definition of research goals; the co-implementation of the research project; and the mobilization of the resulting knowledge. Primarily, the partnership research evaluation model is targeted at the participants in partnership research, to give them tools with which to reflect on their partnership research experience and identify areas for improvement.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Norbert Steinhaus

In Romania, most environmental problems, including deterioration of water source quality, have their origin in intensive industrialization and development of agriculture. The science shop used the report to promote science shop activities as an example of student participation, and also to raise public awareness about the quality of drinking water in Iasi. Iasi underwent a rapid industrialization and population growth. Prior to the beginning of this project, no correlations had been made between the quality of water sources, the water treatment at the Water Works Company and the opinions and expectations of the residents. As the project was conducted through a Romanian science shop, all costs were supported from the MATRA Social Transformation Programme of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which provided seed funding to the science shops.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Felix M. Bivens

This chapter lays out briefly how the work of the Citizenship Development Research Consortium (CDRC) is impacting university curricula and pedagogy across a global selection of higher education institutions (HEIs). The CDRC formed a teaching and learning group which has been experimenting with various ways in which citizenship can be taught within a formal university curricula and a traditional classroom setting. Not all members of the CRDC are university researchers. The Indian non-governmental organization (NGO) in Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) has been one of the core institutional members of the group. PRIA has been an influential pioneer in participatory action research (PAR) and community-based research (CBR) in the global South. PRIA has designed a two-year MA in participatory development which includes a year of intensive coursework and a year of PAR fieldwork.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Felix M. Bivens

The Interdisciplinary Programme on Human Development was launched in 1995. The work of the Human Development programme is structured along four axes: health, nutrition and quality of life; technology, production and environment; cultural processes of learning and human rights; social strategies, public policies and power relations. Academically, the Human Development group works with a variety of students from undergraduate, postgraduate and professional programmes. Many students at all levels are drawn to Chiapas because of the notoriety of the Zapatista movement. The primary academic course facilitated by the Human Development programme is the two-year MA in rural development. Students who stay in the programme for one year receive a diploma in rural development. Some students are awarded funding to continue their research even further so that they may complete a doctorate with the Human Development programme.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
An introduction
Budd L. Hall

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book focuses on community-university research partnerships rather than the broader community-university engagement. It looks at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships. The book provides evidence of the impact of community-university research partnerships on the curriculum in several higher education institutions (HEIs). It talks about the policy dance that community-university research partnerships are engaged in, by looking at the work of the European science shop movement. The book offers some thoughts on the future of community-university research partnerships within the context of a knowledge democracy movement. It is an evaluation framework for partnership research that has emerged from important work in Quebec.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

Felix M. Bivens

The MA in Participation (MAP) had its first intake of students in 2004. MAP is the product of several years of planning and more years of previous work by the Participation, Power and Social Change (PPSC) team at Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. The roots of PPSC connect to the highly influential work of Robert Chambers in the field of participatory development. The curriculum for the first term of MAP has two courses, Foundations of Participation, and Ideas in Development. Foundations of Participation is designed for and open only to MAP students. It is basically two courses in one, divided into two distinct streams: Action Research and Reflective Practice; and Power, Participation and Social Change. The Action Research/ Reflective Practice stream is less conventional in its structure and is key to what makes MAP an innovative programme, curricularly and pedagogically.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
A global perspective
Nirmala Lall

Using the lens of global perspectives, this chapter explores the form, function and impact of community-university research partnerships. It examines participatory approaches to research and impacts that serve to foster, facilitate and strengthen the unique relationship and democratic knowledge exchange process between partners, participants and across the sectors they represent. The chapter demonstrates that the process of measuring impact is informed by how partners and participants directly and indirectly involved in community-university research partnerships. It presents examples of hybrid approaches to assessment and evaluation of community-university research partnerships. Community-university research partners at the University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Programme (CUPP) apply a theory of change to identify a pathway of change, which includes indicators to measure success leading to particular outcomes. Local, regional, national and international community-university research partnership structures, networked together, offer greater opportunities to draw on global perspectives and act in global arenas.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Mandakini Pant

University-community partner equitably contributes their expertise and shares responsibility and ownership to enhance understanding, integrate the knowledge gained, with action to improve the well-being of community members and foster sustainable development. Community-university partnerships can serve as an entry point where local community-based organizations, village communities and public (government) agencies work together in the area of community development and educational enrichment. The cases of Mountain Development Research Centre (MDRC) and Rural Extension Centre's (REC) rural library services show that partnership with community members and civil society organizations (CSOs) has a potential for valuing indigenous knowledge, and knowledge production around citizens' concerns. Rural reconstruction programmes in Sriniketan were primarily organized and coordinated by the REC. The objective of a rural circulating library was to retain acquired literacy skills after education.

in Knowledge, democracy and action