Effective support structures for community– university partnerships
Edward T. Jackson, Letlotlo M. Gariba and Evren Tok

Good architectural design is fundamental to the successful construction, maintenance and liveability of a home. Likewise, the appropriate architecture is necessary in instituting policies and programmes that deepen, broaden, improve and sustain community-university research partnerships. The good news is that much is known about how to design effective support structures to foster and nurture these partnerships. This chapter reviews ten proven examples of such structures, all drawn from the Global North. These structures operate variously at the macro (national or multinational), meso and micro levels. The chapter discusses strategies and tools for evaluating partnerships that can be used by support structures. Finally, the chapter addresses the question of how the Global South can institute support structures to promote community-university research partnerships in poor emerging countries, building on the experience of the North.

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Health and social welfare of disadvantaged families in Brighton and Hastings
Kim Aumann and Angie Hart

The Bouncing Back Project leader, Angie Hart, has a longstanding interest in building resilience that spans her research and practice development career in community health issues with roots in personal history as a mother of three children with complex needs. Angie is also the former Academic Director of the Community-University Partnership Programme at the University of Brighton. The partnership which works through a 'communities of practice' (CoP) model focuses on improving health and well-being by building resilience with disadvantaged children, young people and their families, through resilience therapy (RT). The CoP included a subgroup involved in planning training and evaluation activities. Subsequent development has resulted in a second CoP in Hastings (eighteen members). The CoP model brings together people who are eager to improve the health and well-being of children, young people and families experiencing tough times.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Lessons from case studies from the South and North
Rajesh Tandon and Edward T. Jackson

Community-university research partnerships can enable the co-production of valuable, actionable new knowledge, especially in the areas of livelihoods, environment and governance and their intersection. International cooperation can provide financial and methodological support for community-university partnerships. This chapter presents lessons from case studies from the South and North, which demonstrates the vitality, creativity and relevance of local community-university research partnerships. A main theme addressed by the Southern case studies is strengthening local governance. The Southern cases underscore the central role that participatory methods for inquiry and engagement play in the success of community-university research partnerships. Participatory methods are at the core of successful community-university research partnerships. The Southern cases show that community-university research partnerships can advance government policies to promote better livelihoods, environmental sustainability and indigenous culture.

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The PRIA experience
Mandakini Pant

This chapter provides an account of community education methods which Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) uses in its efforts to make development and democracy equitable and inclusive. It uses select and representative cases to provide an overview of PRIA's community education experiences. PRIA's community education and training programme is based on the principles of collaboration and partnership with local grass-roots organizations. In its cognitive role, PRIA has provided the participatory research framework for education and training. It has been the main source of information around which training programmes are built. The participatory research framework has a citizenship perspective, too. The education and training of marginalized communities in leadership, for instance, emphasizes nurturing independent, rights-bearing citizens who articulate their concerns and priorities, access resources and opportunities and, with increased capacities, make strategic life choices. Governance should be concerned with the restoration of citizenship rights equally and equitably.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
A project on alcohol and older people in Brighton
Juliet Millican and Angie Hart

The Cheers!? project has resulted in further collaboration between Age Concern Brighton, Hove and Portslade, and the University of Brighton, who are now working together on an 'innovative research project' about older people and well-being. The concern was an increase in the number of older people using their services who may have problems with alcohol. Partners were aware of a lack of local evidence and also a lack of services specifically for older people with alcohol problems. They commissioned the university to conduct a scoping study, with further funding from the Brighton and Sussex Community Knowledge Exchange (BSCKE). From the perspective of the Brighton and Hove Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT), the project offered potential for thinking about work with the voluntary sector.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Felix M. Bivens

The University of Brighton (UoB) received a grant from the American-based Atlantic Philanthropies Foundation to create an institutional infrastructure for supporting community-based research (CBR) in Brighton and the surrounding counties of East and West Sussex. Community-University Partnership Programme's (CUPP) role was to act as a nexus between academics and community groups, promoting CBR on both sides of the town-gown line. Many of the CUPP staff came from voluntary sector backgrounds rather than from university roles, which helped them to liaise between the two different cultures, establishing trusted, longstanding relationships with community partners. Although initial projects were based on existing relationships, CUPP took lessons from the science shop model and soon created a helpdesk for fielding community inquiries. Community and Personal Development module (CPD) has been a significant force in helping to bridge the gap between student volunteerism and CBR.

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José Blanes Jiménez and Edgar Antonio Pabón

Under the coordination of Centro Boliviano de Estudios Multidisciplinarios (CEBEM), support for municipal management of indigenous communities was chosen as a key project objective in Bolivia. CEBEM signed a cooperation agreement with the Municipality of Jesus de Machaca to develop a research project, together with the indigenous authorities, to strengthen institutions and spread their experiences. Although the European Union (EU) project has ended, a series of activities continue in the shape of collaboration between CEBEM and the municipality with the aim of identifying steps for collaboration, investments, webpage development and intercultural dialogues through the Intercultural Relations Platform. EU-funded project was approved by the indigenous peoples, peasants and Aboriginals of three countries: Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. The general objective of the project was to build capacity for territorial management on the part of the authorities and their organizations.

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Jorge Téllez Carrasco and José Blanes Jiménez

In the Chiquitania region of Bolivia, precious woods are products of high value that can be acquired from communities through local intermediaries at very low prices. Timber buyers acquire timber from people and communities through a system of loans and exchanges that often disadvantage small producers In 2003, the governments of Bolivia and Spain agreed to undertake a forestry development project in the Chiquitania region. The Chiquitania Forestry development project was undertaken within the VII Joint Hispano-Bolivian Cooperation Commission. In Bolivia, the Forestry Law gives municipalities responsibility for promoting local forestry development activities. The project involved a wide range of participants. To facilitate the adoption of a research-action approach, project coordination was undertaken by a Centro Boliviano de Estudios Multidisciplinarios (CEBEM) researcher. This facilitated the establishment of strategies for monitoring social interaction, support and methodological design.

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Experiences from higher education institutions
Felix M. Bivens

This chapter examines the extent to which community-based research (CBR) programmes at four higher education institutions (HEIs) have impacted the curriculum and pedagogies of the institutions themselves. It provides a review of these four programmes, supplying some background on the CBR programmes and their evolution, and detailing some areas where the growth of these programmes has had an impact on aspects of the institution's curricula and/or pedagogy. The four programmes are: the Master's in Participation (MAP) at the UK's Institute of Development Studies (IDS), and the Community University Partnership Programme at the University of Brighton (CUPP). It also includes the outreach programme at Sewanee, University of the South (US), and the Programa de Investigacion Interdisciplinario Desrarrollo Humano en Chiapas (Interdisciplinary Research Programme on Human Development in Chiapas) at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM), Mexico.

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Science shops and policy development
Eileen Martin, Emma McKenna, Henk Mulder and Norbert Steinhaus

This chapter considers the role of science shops in helping to develop policy to support community engagement within universities, both at the European level and at the country level. It discusses lessons learned by science shops in embedding community-university partnerships in policy, with a view to enhancing their sustainability. A science shop provides independent, participatory research support in response to concerns experienced by civil society. Science shop practitioners recognized the potential links between their work, which aimed to democratize science with the wider European Commission (EC) Science and Society agenda. Attempts have been made by science shops in different countries to either capitalize on current public and institutional policy where it exists or to create a policy context where it does not exist. EC support has also enabled some science shops to make stronger arguments for support at national and local levels.

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