David M. Turner
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Disability and welfare
in Disability in the Industrial Revolution

This chapter focuses on the general (non-medical) support available to sick, injured and impaired mineworkers, and the social and cultural principles that underpinned it. It explores where disabled miners and their families stood within the matrix of welfare expectations and provisions, and how this affected their ability to secure assistance in times of need. The chapter examines mineworkers' experiences of the different strands - domestic, public and voluntary - that constituted the patchwork of care and assistance available to them. As the nineteenth century wore on, the problem of how to effectively support the long-term welfare needs of disabled coalminers and their families attracted other solutions. The permanent relief fund aimed to support the victims of serious accidents, such as where limb amputation had taken place or where men had received spinal damage 'whereby not able to work any longer'.

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Disability in the Industrial Revolution

Physical impairment in British coalmining, 1780–1880

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