Putting the pulp into fiction
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
in Pulp fictions of medieval England

The central figure of the Middle English popular romance known as The King of Tars (hereafter KT) — a formless lump of flesh born instead of a child — defines a certain view of popular literature. The birth is an outrageously sensationalist event; the ideological message conveyed by its subsequent transformation into a human being through baptism is simplistic, vulgar and racist. This chapter concentrates on the treatment of the lump in order to show how its treatment throws into relief the different configurations of paternity and maternity, of gender roles and of religious politics put forward in a range of re-tellings.

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Pulp fictions of medieval England

Essays in popular romance

Editor: Nicola McDonald
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